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IEEE Honors Iconic Engineers

Vint Cerf and Denso are among the recipients

3 min read
A group of gold IEEE Medals on black background.
IEEE Awards Program

Meet the recipients of the 2023 IEEE Medals and Recognitions. The awards are presented on behalf of the IEEE Board of Directors.

IEEE MEDAL OF HONOR

Sponsor:IEEE Foundation

VINTON G. CERF

Google, LLC

Reston, Va.

“For co-creating the Internet architecture and providing sustained leadership in its phenomenal growth in becoming society’s critical infrastructure.”

IEEE FRANCES E. ALLEN MEDAL

Sponsor:IBM

LYDIA KAVRAKI

Rice University

Houston

“For foundational probabilistic algorithms and randomized search methods that have broad impact in robotic motion planning and computational biology.”

IEEE ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL MEDAL

Sponsor:Nokia Bell Labs

Corecipients:

INGEBORG J. HOCHMAIR-DESOYER

ERWIN HOCHMAIR

MED-EL Elektromedizinische Geräte GmbH

Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria

“For the research, development, and realization of multi-channel microelectronic cochlear implants.”

IEEE EDISON MEDAL

Sponsor: Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.

HIROYUKI MATSUNAMI

Kyoto University

“For pioneering contributions to the development of silicon carbide material and its applications to electronic power devices.”

IEEE MEDAL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES

Sponsor:Toyota Motor Corp.

Corecipients:

DAVID JAMES COE

Philips Research Laboratories

Redhill, Surrey, England

GERALD F. DEBOY

Infineon Technologies Austria AG

Villach, Austria

TATSUHIKO FUJIHIRA

Fuji Electric

Matsumoto, Japan

“For contributions to the concept and realization of superjunction power devices that significantly improve power efficiency.”

IEEE FOUNDERS MEDAL

Sponsor: IEEE Richard and Mary Jo Stanley Memorial Fund of the IEEE Foundation

RODNEY ALLEN BROOKS

MIT

“For leadership in research and commercialization of autonomous robotics, including mobile, humanoid, service, and manufacturing robots.”

IEEE RICHARD W. HAMMING MEDAL

Sponsor:Qualcomm, Inc.

FRANK KSCHISCHANG

University of Toronto

“For contributions to the theory and practice of error correcting codes and optical communications.”

IEEE MEDAL FOR INNOVATIONS IN HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGY

Sponsor:IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society

REBECCA RICHARDS-KORTUM

Rice University

Houston

“For contributions to optical solutions for cancer detection and leadership in establishing the field of global health engineering.”

IEEE JACK S. KILBY SIGNAL PROCESSING MEDAL

Sponsor:Apple

JOSÉ M. F. MOURA

Carnegie Mellon

“For contributions to theory and practice of statistical, graph, and distributed signal processing.”

IEEE/RSE JAMES CLERK MAXWELL MEDAL

Sponsor:Arm

MAU-CHUNG FRANK CHANG

University of California, Los Angeles

“For contributions to heterojunction device technology and CMOS System-on-Chip realizations with unprecedented reconfigurability and bandwidth.”

IEEE JAMES H. MULLIGAN, JR. EDUCATION MEDAL

Sponsor:MathWorks, Pearson, Lockheed Martin Corp.,and theIEEE Life Members Fund

JAMES J. TRUCHARD

National Instruments, retired

Austin, Texas

“For the development of LabVIEW and establishing worldwide programs to enhance hands-on learning in laboratories and classrooms.”

IEEE MILDRED DRESSELHAUS MEDAL

Sponsor:Google, LLC

MELBA CRAWFORD

Purdue University

West Lafayette, Ind.

“For contributions to remote sensing technology and leadership in its application for the benefit of humanity.”

IEEE JUN-ICHI NISHIZAWA MEDAL

Sponsor: The Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal Fund

JAMES S. HARRIS

Stanford

“For contributions to epitaxial growth and nanofabrication of materials and heterojunction devices.”

IEEE ROBERT N. NOYCE MEDAL

Sponsor:Intel Corp.

LUC VAN DEN HOVE

IMEC

Heverlee, Belgium

“For leadership in creating a worldwide research ecosystem in nano-electronics technology with applications ranging from high-performance computing to health.”

IEEE DENNIS J. PICARD MEDAL FOR RADAR TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS

Sponsor:Raytheon Technologies

ALBERTO MOREIRA

Microwaves and Radar Institute

Oberpfaffenhofen, Bavaria, Germany

“For leadership and innovative concepts in the design, deployment, and utilization of airborne and space-based radar systems.”

IEEE MEDAL IN POWER ENGINEERING

Sponsors: The IEEEIndustry Applications,Industrial Electronics,Power Electronics, andPower & Energysocieties

KAMAL AL-HADDAD

École de Technologie Supérieure

Montréal

“For contributions to power electronics converters for power quality and industrial applications.”

IEEE SIMON RAMO MEDAL

Sponsor:Northrop Grumman Corp.

AZAD MADNI

University of Southern California, Los Angeles

“For pioneering contributions to model-based systems engineering, education, and industrial impact using interdisciplinary approaches.”

IEEE JOHN VON NEUMANN MEDAL

Sponsor:IBM

FRANK THOMSON (TOM) LEIGHTON

Akamai Technologies

Cambridge, Mass.

“For fundamental contributions to algorithm design and their application to content delivery networks.”

IEEE CORPORATE INNOVATION AWARD

Sponsor:IEEE

DENSO

Kariya, Aichi, Japan

“For the innovation of QR (Quick Response) code and their widespread use across the globe.”

IEEE RICHARD M. EMBERSON AWARD

Sponsor:IEEE Technical Activities Board

W. ROSS STONE

Stoneware Ltd.

San Diego

“For sustained contributions to and impactful leadership in the IEEE Technical Activities publication enterprise.”

IEEE HARADEN PRATT AWARD

Sponsor:IEEE Foundation

MARKO DELIMAR

University of Zagreb

Croatia

“For inspired vision and steadfast leadership in improving global IEEE influence, member engagement, and governance.”

IEEE HONORARY MEMBERSHIP

Sponsor:IEEE

DONNA STRICKLAND

University of Waterloo

Ontario, Canada

“For contributions to the demonstration of chirped pulse amplification, a method to increase output power in ultrashort pulse solid-state lasers.”

IEEE THEODORE W. HISSEY OUTSTANDING YOUNG PROFESSIONAL AWARD

Sponsor: TheIEEE Young Professionals Committee, theIEEE Photonics Society, theIEEE Power & Energy Society

ANNA ZAKRZEWSKA

Dell Technologies

Dublin

“For contributions in telecommunications research and innovation, leading to global commercialization, while inspiring tomorrow’s young technology leaders through STEM volunteering work.”

For additional information on the recipients and the awards process, please visit the IEEE Awards website.

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