Search Results for nanotechnology mobile phone (33)

  1. Mobile Phones Need Nanotechnology for...I Choose Better Batteries

    Ughâ'¿I just read an interview with the Executive Vice President of the new markets group at Nokia and was distressed to discover that there doesnâ''t seem to be a clear understanding of what good nanotechnology is for mobile phones. Last year Nokia and Cambridge University were crowing about a cartoon they made about what could be done when you combine plastic electronics with mobile phone technologies: A Dick-Tracy-like watch/cell phone. Okay, it was good marketing for both Cambridge and Nokia, but I would be hard pressed to believe that any of the researchers at either outfit earnestly believed they were …

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  2. 'Nanoball' Batteries Charge a Mobile Phone in Ten Seconds

    I complained last week that it seemed as though an opportunity to employ nanotechnology to improve the battery life of mobile phones was being missed. While this might be a legitimate criticism leveled at the corporate types, for the scientist types nothing could be further from the truth. Researchers Byoungwoo Kang and Gerbrand Ceder at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have published in Nature their research on a battery that charges about 100 times as fast as normal lithium ion batteries, resulting in a mobile phone that could charge in 10 seconds and 5 minutes for hybrid electric cars. The …

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  3. Nano Projector that fits in your pocket

    Israeli-based Explay has developed the worldâ''s smallest image projector that can be carried in your pocket as you dash off to give your next presentation. While I am sure this is very exciting for those who donâ''t like to depend on the A/V team at their next conference, or like to make their friends and family endure large images of the photos taken on their mobile phone camera, itâ''s not clear that there is any nanotechnology in the phone, other than the name â''Nano Projectorâ''. Information on the technology of the projector can be found

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  4. Nanotechnology's Promise of Virus-Enabled Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Last week my rueful exposition on the state of applying nanotechnology to mobile phones received support and encouragement from Kristen Kulinowski, who was recently highlighted over at Andrew Maynardâ''s 20/20 blog. In addition to the encouragement, I was asked about my supposition on the possibility of virus-enabled lithium-ion batteries being commercially available by the end of this year. These batteries build on Angela Belcherâ''s research at MIT of getting organic materials, like a man-made virus, to attract inorganic materials like gold, or in the case of this battery technology the viruses coat themselves with iron phosphate. But as far as …

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