Viruses Enable Carbon Nanotubes to Better Conduct Electrons in Solar Cells

Virus-enabled technique could find commercial application for companies producing dye-sensitized solar cells

1 min read
Viruses Enable Carbon Nanotubes to Better Conduct Electrons in Solar Cells

One of the fundamental problems in using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for solar cell applications is that you often get a mix of  semi-conducting nanotubes and conducting (metallic) CNTs.

While a couple of years back researchers discovered that adding imperfections to CNTs used in dye-sensitized solar cells helped in their catalytic function, it did not seem to do much for their conductivity, or really make much of a marked effect on their overall efficiency.

But now Angela Belcher and her research associates at MIT, who have been using viruses to improve lithium-ion batteries, have found that they can use viruses to sort out the various nanotubes and create a better material for transporting electrons through it

The research, which was initially published in the journal Nature Nanotechnologydescribes how by the manipulation of the protein sequence of the M13 virus it created a pH switch that attracts the carbon nanotubes to it.

While the research used dye-sensitized solar cells, the researchers believe that the technique could be used with quantum-dot and organic solar cells.

It is the level of improved efficiency that is obtained through this technique that has impressed. It is reported that this method can improve the efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cells by 30%, bringing their conversion rate to 8 to 10%. Not earth shattering numbers, but an improvement with these types of solar cells. 

In the article cited above, Prashant Kamat, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Notre Dame University who has done extensive work on dye-sensitized solar cell, comments, “Dye-sensitized solar cells have already been commercialized in Japan, Korea and Taiwan,” he says. “If the addition of carbon nanotubes via the virus process can improve their efficiency, “the industry is likely to adopt such processes.”

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Two Startups Are Bringing Fiber to the Processor

Avicena’s blue microLEDs are the dark horse in a race with Ayar Labs’ laser-based system

5 min read
Diffuse blue light shines from a patterned surface through a ring. A blue cable leads away from it.

Avicena’s microLED chiplets could one day link all the CPUs in a computer cluster together.

Avicena

If a CPU in Seoul sends a byte of data to a processor in Prague, the information covers most of the distance as light, zipping along with no resistance. But put both those processors on the same motherboard, and they’ll need to communicate over energy-sapping copper, which slow the communication speeds possible within computers. Two Silicon Valley startups, Avicena and Ayar Labs, are doing something about that longstanding limit. If they succeed in their attempts to finally bring optical fiber all the way to the processor, it might not just accelerate computing—it might also remake it.

Both companies are developing fiber-connected chiplets, small chips meant to share a high-bandwidth connection with CPUs and other data-hungry silicon in a shared package. They are each ramping up production in 2023, though it may be a couple of years before we see a computer on the market with either product.

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