Start-up Puts the Carbon on the Cathode of Li-ion Batteries

A new company is bettting on a novel electrochemical approach to Li-ion batteries

2 min read
Start-up Puts the Carbon on the Cathode of Li-ion Batteries
Photo: David Dodge

The approach of many researchers seeking to improve the ubiquitous lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery has been to replace the graphite typically used for the battery's anode. Now, in work that originated at the University of Alberta in Canada, the focus has moved to the cathode. The result, claims lead researcher Xinwei Cui, is a battery that can deliver an energy output five to eight times that of the Li-ion batteries currently available.

So confident is Cui, whose research was published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports, that he has co-founded AdvEn Solutions, which is manufacturing the batteries for use in electronic devices and plans to have something on the market by the end of this year.

“What we’ve done is develop a new electrochemistry technology that can provide high energy density and high power density for the next generation,” said Cui in a press release.

The new electrochemistry involves using fluorinated carbon nanotubes in the cathode. Earlier attempts at using carbon and fluorine in the cathode had produced non-rechargeable batteries. Research instead focused on lithium-sulfur, or lithium-air based cathodes. But using flourinated carbon nanotubes allowed for a rechargeable battery that also overcomes some of the issues associated with the lithum-sulfur and lithium-air cathodes, such as large volume expansion when the cathode fills up with ions that shortens a battery's life span.

Batteries using the fluorinated carbon nanotubes in their cathode demonstrated a maximum discharging capacity of 2174 milliamp-hours per gram (mAh/g) and a specific energy density of 4113 Watt-hours per kilogram (Wh/kg), compared to  an average Li-ion battery that has a discharging capacity of 372mAh/g and a specific energy of around 100 to 265 Wh/kg.

AdvEn Solutions plans to produce three types of batteries based on fluorinated carbon nanotube architecture. One of the batteries will have a high power output and long-life cycle, the second will provide high energy and quick charging rates and the third will have a super-high energy storage capacity.

“We have a long way to go, but we’re on the right track. It’s exciting work and we want everyone to know about it and that it’s very young but promising,” said Cui.

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Two Startups Are Bringing Fiber to the Processor

Avicena’s blue microLEDs are the dark horse in a race with Ayar Labs’ laser-based system

5 min read
Diffuse blue light shines from a patterned surface through a ring. A blue cable leads away from it.

Avicena’s microLED chiplets could one day link all the CPUs in a computer cluster together.

Avicena

If a CPU in Seoul sends a byte of data to a processor in Prague, the information covers most of the distance as light, zipping along with no resistance. But put both those processors on the same motherboard, and they’ll need to communicate over energy-sapping copper, which slow the communication speeds possible within computers. Two Silicon Valley startups, Avicena and Ayar Labs, are doing something about that longstanding limit. If they succeed in their attempts to finally bring optical fiber all the way to the processor, it might not just accelerate computing—it might also remake it.

Both companies are developing fiber-connected chiplets, small chips meant to share a high-bandwidth connection with CPUs and other data-hungry silicon in a shared package. They are each ramping up production in 2023, though it may be a couple of years before we see a computer on the market with either product.

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