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SQL, Java Top List of Most In-Demand Tech Skills

But Python, now at number three, and AWS, at number six, are coming on fast, says job search firm Indeed

2 min read
Illustration of a computer with SQL beneath it
Illustration: iStockphoto

What tech skills do U.S. employers want? Researchers at job search site Indeed took a deep dive into its database to answer that question. And, at least for now, expertise in SQL came out on top of the list of most highly sought after skills, followed by Java. Python and Amazon Web Services (AWS) are coming on fast, and, should trends continue, may take over the lead in the next year or two. (Python came out on top in IEEE Spectrum’s analysis of top programming languages for 2019.)

Indeed’s team considered U.S. English-language jobs posted on the site between September 2014 and September 2019; those postings encompassed 571 tech skills. Over that period, Docker, the enterprise container platform, sits at number 20 on the list today, but that is the result of a dramatic climb over that five-year period. Demand for proficiency in that platform-as-a-service grew more than 4000 percent, from a barely registering share of 0.1 percent of job post mentions in 2014 to 5.1 percent today. Azure jumped more than 1000 percent during that period, from 0.6 percent to 6.9 percent; and the general category of machine learning climbed 439 percent, closely followed by AWS at 418 percent. (The top 20 for 2019, along with their 2014 shares, are listed in the table below.)

Indeed tech skills 2019 graphic

Indeed’s researchers note that the big jumps in demand for engineers skilled in Python stems from the boom in data scientist and engineer jobs, which disproportionately use Python. AES’s growth, they indicated, has been fueled by the proliferation of full stack developer and development operations engineering positions.

Employer Interest in Tech Skills

Key: Green = greater than 10 percent increase, Red = greater than 10 percent decrease, Yellow = less than 10 percent increase or decrease

RankSkill2014 Share2019 ShareChange
1SQL23.6%21.9%-7%
2Java19.7%20.8%6%
3Python8.1%18.0%123%
4Linux14.9%14.9%0%
5Javascript12.4%14.5%17%
6AWS2.7%14.2%418%
7C++10.6%10.7%1%
8C9.3%10.3%11%
9C#8.3%9.3%11%
10.net9.9%8.4%-15%
11Oracle13.5%8.4%-38%
12HTML9.8%8.1%-17%
13Scrum4.8%8.0%64%
14Git3.1%7.8%148%
15CSS7.8%7.3%-5%
16Machine Learning1.3%7.0%439%
17Azure0.6%6.9%1107%
18Unix10.0%6.7%-33%
19SQL Server7.8%6.5%-17%
20Docker0.1%5.1%4162%

Source: Indeed

This post was updated on 20 November.

A version of this post appears in the January 2020 print magazine as “Skills Wanted.”

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Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

His pivot from defense helped a tiny tuning-fork prevent SUV rollovers and plane crashes

11 min read
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Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

In 1992, Asad M. Madni sat at the helm of BEI Sensors and Controls, overseeing a product line that included a variety of sensor and inertial-navigation devices, but its customers were less varied—mainly, the aerospace and defense electronics industries.

And he had a problem.

The Cold War had ended, crashing the U.S. defense industry. And business wasn’t going to come back anytime soon. BEI needed to identify and capture new customers—and quickly.

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