Special Report: China’s Tech Revolution

How technology is driving the country’s economic boom and what that means for the World

1 min read
A high-tech ad for a computer game gets around the old-fashioned way outside a Shanghai shopping mall.
Photo: Claro Cortes IV/Reuters/Corbis

Issue Editors 

Jean Kumagai & William Sweet

Reporting by 

Steven Cherry, Peter Fairley, Linda Geppert, Marlowe Hood, Jean Kumagai, Jen Lin-Liu, Tekla S. Perry, Prachi Patel Predd, and William Sweet

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Blood Test Only Needs a Drop and a Smartphone for Results

The tech shows promise, although user-friendly “single drop of blood” platforms are still a few years away

4 min read
Close up of a phone showing a tight view of a small vial of red liquid encased in a cup holder below it.

University of Washington researchers have developed a new blood-clotting test that uses only a single drop of blood and a smartphone with a plastic attachment that holds a tiny cup [shown here] beneath the phone’s camera. This photo simulates how this system works; the “blood” shown here is not real.

Mark Stone/University of Washington

The phrase “from a single drop of blood” is full of both promise and peril for researchers trying to integrate clinical-quality medical testing technology with consumer devices like smartphones. While university researchers and commercial startups worldwide continue to introduce innovative new consumer-friendly takes on tests that have resided in laboratories for decades, the collective memory of the fraud perpetrated by those behind Theranos’s discredited blood-testing platform is still pervasive.

“What are you claiming from a single drop of blood?” says Shyamnath Gollakota, director of the mobile intelligence lab at the University of Washington’s Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering. Gollakota and colleagues have developed a proof-of-concept test that is able to analyze how quickly a person’s blood clots using a single drop of blood by utilizing a smartphone’s camera, haptic motor, a small attached cup, and a floating piece of copper about the size of a ballpoint pen’s writing tip.

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New Records for the Biggest and Smallest AI Computers

Nvidia H100 and Intel Sapphire Rapids Xeon debut on ML Perf training benchmarks

6 min read
A black board with rainbow colored chip and electronics

Nvidia revealed the first benchmark tests for AI training on the new H100 GPU.

Nvidia

The machine-learning consortium MLCommons released the latest set of benchmark results last week, offering a glimpse at the capabilities of new chips and old as they tackled executing lightweight AI on the tiniest systems and training neural networks at both server and supercomputer scales. The benchmark tests saw the debut of new chips from Intel and Nvidia as well as speed boosts from software improvements and predictions that new software will play a role in speeding the new chips in the years after their debut.

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Learn How Global Configuration Management and IBM CLM Work Together

In this presentation we will build the case for component-based requirements management

2 min read

This is a sponsored article brought to you by 321 Gang.

To fully support Requirements Management (RM) best practices, a tool needs to support traceability, versioning, reuse, and Product Line Engineering (PLE). This is especially true when designing large complex systems or systems that follow standards and regulations. Most modern requirement tools do a decent job of capturing requirements and related metadata. Some tools also support rudimentary mechanisms for baselining and traceability capabilities (“linking” requirements). The earlier versions of IBM DOORS Next supported a rich configurable traceability and even a rudimentary form of reuse. DOORS Next became a complete solution for managing requirements a few years ago when IBM invented and implemented Global Configuration Management (GCM) as part of its Engineering Lifecycle Management (ELM, formerly known as Collaborative Lifecycle Management or simply CLM) suite of integrated tools. On the surface, it seems that GCM just provides versioning capability, but it is so much more than that. GCM arms product/system development organizations with support for advanced requirement reuse, traceability that supports versioning, release management and variant management. It is also possible to manage collections of related Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) and Systems Engineering artifacts in a single configuration.

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