Signals Specialist Karin Sigloch Probes the Planet’s Darkest Secrets

Sigloch’s algorithms reveal the hidden forces that shape the world

5 min read
Signals Specialist Karin Sigloch Probes the Planet’s Darkest Secrets
Photo: Antoine Doyen

Sixty-five million years ago, in the waning days of the dinosaurs, when India was still floating alone near Madagascar, an upwelling of hot rock from deep in the Earth’s mantle called a plume broke through the continent, depositing a 2-kilometer-thick blanket of volcanic material that can still be seen today. Then India migrated northeastward, eventually slamming into Eurasia. But the plume stayed put. And as the Indian and African plates passed over it, it spawned a chain of volcanic islands that now decorate the floor of the Indian Ocean. Today, that plume sits under Réunion, a French island located east of Madagascar.

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Damaged Hearts Next in Line for Powerful mRNA Therapies

COVID-19 vaccine technology now points toward repairing ravages of heart attacks

3 min read
Light and dark pink sections of a microscopic view of heart tissue

Light micrograph of a section through the endocardium, the membrane that lines the heart (across top), following a heart attack. Necrotic (dead) muscle fibres (across bottom) have stained a deeper red, but their nuclei no longer stain.

CNRI/Science Source

The messenger RNA COVID-19 vaccines, including ones made by Moderna and Pfizer, notched some famous successes and pioneered the use of mRNA technology along the way. Now, scientists are applying testing similar technologies as treatments for a variety of conditions, including heart injury. New research presented in April at the Frontiers in CardioVascular Biomedicine 2022 conference shows that mRNA can help heart cells regenerate after being damaged from a heart attack—and has the potential to be an effective therapy. Other recent research treating cardiac injury using similar approaches has also shown promise. Should these treatments be effective in people, they would be among the first to heal damage after a heart attack, which current treatments for heart attack don't really do.

“A real solution is not provided to the patient,” said Dr. Maria Clara Labonia, a medical doctor and Ph.D student at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands who is the lead author of the study. “So many aims are towards new therapeutic strategies.”

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Video Friday: Drone in a Cage

Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos

3 min read
A drone inside of a protective geometric cage flies through a dark rain

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your friends at IEEE Spectrum robotics. We also post a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months. Please send us your events for inclusion.

ICRA 2022: 23 May–27 May 2022, PHILADELPHIA
IEEE ARSO 2022: 28 May–30 May 2022, LONG BEACH, CALIF.
RSS 2022: 21 June–1 July 2022, NEW YORK CITY
ERF 2022: 28 June–30 June 2022, ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
RoboCup 2022: 11 July–17 July 2022, BANGKOK
IEEE CASE 2022: 20 August–24 August 2022, MEXICO CITY
CLAWAR 2022: 12 September–14 September 2022, AZORES, PORTUGAL

Enjoy today’s videos!

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Optimize Your Lab for Hybrid Learning

Set up a hybrid teaching lab that offers professional-grade tools with seamless connectivity and productivity

1 min read

As an engineering educator, you want to enable your students with the best skillsets for success in the real-world. This means giving them hands-on experience. Now, you can empower your students to test, analyze, and share results collaboratively — whether they are in the lab or not. Download now!

See what it takes to set up a productive teaching lab that offers:

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