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Signals Specialist Karin Sigloch Probes the Planet’s Darkest Secrets

Sigloch’s algorithms reveal the hidden forces that shape the world

5 min read
Signals Specialist Karin Sigloch Probes the Planet’s Darkest Secrets
Photo: Antoine Doyen

Sixty-five million years ago, in the waning daysof the dinosaurs, when India was still floating alone near Madagascar, an upwelling of hot rock from deep in the Earth’s mantle called a plume broke through the continent, depositing a 2-kilometer-thick blanket of volcanic material that can still be seen today. Then India migrated northeastward, eventually slamming into Eurasia. But the plume stayed put. And as the Indian and African plates passed over it, it spawned a chain of volcanic islands that now decorate the floor of the Indian Ocean. Today, that plume sits under Réunion, a French island located east of Madagascar.

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Video Friday: Humanoid Soccer

Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos

4 min read
Humans and human-sized humanoid robots stand together on an indoor soccer field at the beginning of a game

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your friends at IEEE Spectrum robotics. We also post a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months. Please send us your events for inclusion.

CoRL 2022: 14–18 December 2022, AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND
ICRA 2023: 29 May–2 June 2023, LONDON

Enjoy today’s videos!

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Array of devices on a chip

This analog electrochemical memory (ECRAM) array provides a prototype for artificial synapses in AI training.

IBM research

How far away could be an artificial brain? Perhaps a very long way still, but a working analogue to the essential element of the brain’s networks, the synapse, appears closer at hand now.

That’s because a device that draws inspiration from batteries now appears surprisingly well suited to run artificial neural networks. Called electrochemical RAM (ECRAM), it is giving traditional transistor-based AI an unexpected run for its money—and is quickly moving toward the head of the pack in the race to develop the perfect artificial synapse. Researchers recently reported a string of advances at this week’s IEEE International Electron Device Meeting (IEDM 2022) and elsewhere, including ECRAM devices that use less energy, hold memory longer, and take up less space.

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Get the Coursera Campus Skills Report 2022

Download the report to learn which job skills students need to build high-growth careers

1 min read

Get comprehensive insights into higher education skill trends based on data from 3.8M registered learners on Coursera, and learn clear steps you can take to ensure your institution's engineering curriculum is aligned with the needs of the current and future job market. Download the report now!