Five women standing in front of a sign that says IEEE Education Week

IEEE staff members in Piscataway, N.J. display items to mark IEEE Education Week.

IEEE

IEEE members across the globe came together to celebrate the first-ever IEEE Education Week from 4 to 8 April. The weeklong celebration highlighted educational opportunities provided by IEEE and its many organizational units. More than 60 IEEE operating units, regions, sections, and technical societies offered live events, virtual resources, special offers, and a daily online quiz that awarded a digital badge for participants who answered correctly.

“Education Week was a chance to show the collective impact IEEE has on lifelong learning and education at every level,” says Jamie Moesch, managing director, Educational Activities. “From preuniversity STEM programs and university offerings to continuing professional education courses and tutorials, there are so many ways to engage with education from IEEE. This week was about bringing all those resources together in one place and making sure our members know about all of the amazing educational opportunities available to them.”


The celebration highlighted resources for:

  • Engineers and professionals working in technical fields.
  • University students and faculty members.
  • Anyone looking for preuniversity STEM education resources and experiences to encourage the next generation of engineers and technologists.

Events included:

“For both young technical professionals and those who are more established in their fields, taking the time to learn new skills in this age of hybrid and remote working can help their careers flourish,” says Stephen Phillips, vice president, IEEE Educational Activities.

A group of students hold up signs that spell IEEE Edu Week 2022 along with a banner.The IEEE Antennas, Propagation, Microwave Theory, and Techniques student branch chapter at the Indian Institute of Technology, in Kharagpur, celebrated IEEE Education Week at Hijli College, in West Bengal, India. On 9 April, they led a hands-on session on how to use basic electronic components like resistors, switches, buzzers, wires, breadboards, and DC battery sources. Pallab Kumar Gogoi

“IEEE Education Week highlighted all of the preuniversity STEM, university, and continuing professional education resources for students, engineers, and technical professionals,” says Babak Beheshti, chair of the IEEE Educational Activities continuing education committee. “As the private sector ramps up hiring, many are looking for candidates who have skills in emerging technologies. IEEE’s educational offerings directly address this increasing need.”

Save the date for next year’s IEEE Education Week, to be held from 2 to 8 April. Follow updates on social media via #EducationAtIEEE and sign up for email updates at educationweek.ieee.org.

​The inaugural event also boasts some impressive stats:

• 225 events.
• 102 resources provided.
• 90 volunteer ambassadors from 23 countries.
• Participation by 65 operating units, regions, sections, and technical society partners.
• 434 quiz submissions.
• 80 digital badges issued.
• Visitors from 99 countries.
• US $5,975 donated to the IEEE Foundation to support educational programs.

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