New Courses on Technical Standards Used in Aerospace and Defense

They also cover life cycle processes and best practices

2 min read
 U.S. F-35 fighter jet flying in a blue sky
Harald Tittel/picture alliance/Getty Images

As the world tries to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, the aerospace and defense industries are predicted to grow from US $416 billion to $551 billion by 2030, according to Mordor Intelligence. The growth means increased development of aviation, space, and other systems that are crucial to the industries. The use of technical standards can ensure that critical software and systems components that run the systems are reliable and secure.

To help systems engineers, software engineers, and people working on back-end systems, IEEE Educational Activities and the IEEE Standards Association partnered to create a five-course program: IEEE Software and Systems Engineering Standards Used in Aerospace and Defense. The program offers an overview of IEEE Std. 1012 and the IEEE 29119 series of standards developed with the aerospace and defense industries.

The courses offered in the program are:

Life Cycle Processes

From this course, learners can better understand engineering concepts, be able to select and apply systems and software engineering standards, and employ special considerations for critical programs. Complex issues throughout the life cycle are covered.

Implementing DevOps Best Practices

This course discusses the required development and operations practices for building reliable and secure systems both in general and in regulated environments. Learners can better understand DevOps, including how the practices can be implemented and what their value is.

Verification and Validation of Systems, Software, and Hardware

Learners explore the basic concepts, purposes, and benefits of verification and validation in software and hardware covered in IEEE Std. 1012.

Software Testing Driven by Standards and Models

This course provides an overview of the IEEE 29119 series of standards. It teaches how the standards can be applied during the software life cycle, with an emphasis on aerospace and defense purposes.

Using ISO/IEC/IEEE 29119 for Software Testing

This series of courses explores the five steps taught in the Software Testing Driven by Standards and Models course. The series provides details on the five supporting parts of the IEEE 29119 series of standards, from proposal to retirement. Included are processes, documentation, testing techniques, and keyword-driven testing.

Individuals who complete the program can earn up to 0.5 continuing education units or five professional development hour credits, plus a digital badge.

Institutions interested in the program can contact an IEEE account specialist to learn more.

Visit the IEEE Learning Network for member and nonmember pricing.

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