Find Out Who Received a 2021 IEEE Major Award

Jacob Ziv and Steve Wozniak were among the recipients

6 min read
A group of gold IEEE Medals on black background.
Photo: IEEE Awards Program

THE INSTITUTE Here are the recipients of the 2021 IEEE medals, service awards, honorary membership, corporate recognition, and technical field awards. The awards are presented on behalf of the IEEE Board of Directors.

MEDALS AND RECOGNITIONS

IEEE MEDAL OF HONOR

Sponsor: IEEE Foundation

JACOB ZIV

Israel Institute of Technology, retired
Haifa, Israel

“For fundamental contributions to information theory and data compression technology, and for distinguished research leadership.”

IEEE ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL MEDAL

Sponsor: Nokia Bell Labs

NICK MCKEOWN

Stanford

“For contributions to internet router architecture and software-defined networking.”

IEEE MILDRED DRESSELHAUS MEDAL

Sponsor: Google

KRISTINA M. JOHNSON

The Ohio State University
Columbus

“For leadership and technical contributions spanning academia, government, and business.”

IEEE EDISON MEDAL

Sponsor: Samsung Electronics Co.

KENICHI IGA

Tokyo Institute of Technology, retired

"For pioneering contributions to the concept, physics, and development of the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser.”

IEEE MEDAL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES

Sponsor: Toyota Motor Corp.

KAUSHIK RAJASHEKARA

University of Houston
Texas

“For contributions to the advancement of transportation electrification technologies for the reduction of emissions and for improving energy efficiency.”

IEEE FOUNDERS MEDAL

Sponsor: IEEE Richard and Mary Jo Stanley Memorial Fund of the IEEE Foundation

HENRY SAMUELI

Broadcom, retired
Irvine, Calif.

“For leadership in research, development, and commercialization of broadband communication and networking technology with global impact.”

IEEE RICHARD W. HAMMING MEDAL

Sponsor: Qualcomm

RAYMOND W. YEUNG

The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Shatin, Hong Kong

“For fundamental contributions to information theory and pioneering network coding and its applications.”

IEEE MEDAL FOR INNOVATIONS IN HEALTHCARE TECHNOLOGY

Sponsor: IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society

RUZENA BAJCSY
University of California, Berkeley

“For pioneering and sustained contributions to healthcare technology fundamental to computer vision, medical imaging, and computational anatomy.”

IEEE THEODORE W. HISSEY OUTSTANDING YOUNG PROFESSIONAL AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Young Professionals, Photonics Society, Power & Energy Society

KARTIK KULKARNI
Oracle Corp.
Redwood City, Calif.

“For contributions to the technical fields of transactions and in-memory databases, as well as for enabling young professionals working on technologies for sustainable development.”

IEEE JACK S. KILBY SIGNAL PROCESSING MEDAL

Sponsor: Texas Instruments

Corecipients:

EMMANUEL CANDÈS

Stanford

TERENCE CHI-SHEN TAO

University of California, Los Angeles

JUSTIN ROMBERG

Georgia Institute of Technology

“For groundbreaking contributions to compressed sensing.”

IEEE/RSE JAMES CLERK MAXWELL MEDAL

Funder: ARM

EVELYN L. HU

Harvard

“For leadership in nanoscale science and engineering, and for seminal contributions at the intersection of semiconductor electronics and photonics.”

IEEE JAMES H. MULLIGAN, JR. EDUCATION MEDAL

Sponsor: MathWorks, Pearson, Lockheed Martin Corp., and the IEEE Life Members Fund

JOHN D. CRESSLER

Georgia Institute of Technology

“For inspirational teaching and mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students.”

IEEE JUN-ICHI NISHIZAWA MEDAL

Sponsor: The Federation of Electric Power Companies, Japan

JAMES J. COLEMAN

University of Texas at Arlington

“For contributions to the development of strained-layer semiconductor lasers.”

IEEE ROBERT N. NOYCE MEDAL

Sponsor: Intel Corp.

LISA T. SU

Advanced Micro Devices
Austin, Texas

“For leadership in ground-breaking semiconductor products and successful business strategies that contributed to the strength of the microelectronics industry.”

IEEE DENNIS J. PICARD MEDAL FOR RADAR TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS

Sponsor: Raytheon Technologies

SIMON HAYKIN

McMaster University, retired
Hamilton, Ont., Canada

“For contributions to the development of the theory and practice of radar, especially cognitive radar and adaptive filtering.”

IEEE MEDAL IN POWER ENGINEERING

Sponsors: IEEE Industry Applications, Industrial Electronics, Power Electronics, and Power & Energy societies

PRAVEEN K. JAIN

Queen’s University
Kingston, Ont., Canada

“For contributions to the theory and practice of high-frequency power-conversion systems.”

IEEE SIMON RAMO MEDAL

Sponsor: Northrop Grumman Corp.

ELISABETH PATÉ-CORNELL

Stanford

“For sustained leadership in developing theory and applications of probability risk analysis for the design and evaluation of complex engineering systems.”

IEEE JOHN VON NEUMANN MEDAL

Sponsor: IBM Corp.

JEFFREY DEAN

Google
Mountain View, Calif.

“For contributions to the science and engineering of large-scale distributed computer systems and artificial intelligence systems.”

IEEE CORPORATE INNOVATION AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE

TAIWAN SEMICONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING COMPANY, LIMITED

Hsinchu, Taiwan

“For leadership in 7 nanometer semiconductor foundry technology, enabling customers’ innovations in widespread applications.”

IEEE RICHARD M. EMBERSON AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Technical Activities Board

LEWIS M. TERMAN

IBM, retired
South Salem, N.Y.

“For contributions to and leadership of multiple IEEE technical Societies, the Technical Activities Board, and the IEEE Humanitarian Technology Activities.”

IEEE HARADEN PRATT AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Foundation

EVELYN H. HIRT

Battelle
Richland, Wash.

“For steadfast service and leadership dedicated to the IEEE mission and members across all corporate, geographic, technical, and educational levels.”

IEEE HONORARY MEMBERSHIP

Sponsor: IEEE

EDWARD C. STONE

California Institute of Technology
Pasadena

“For decades of exceptional scientific and engineering achievements that have profoundly impacted the world’s progress in space exploration.”

TECHNICAL FIELD AWARDS

IEEE BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING AWARD

Sponsors: IEEE Circuits and Systems and IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology societies

KATHERINE WHITTAKER FERRARA

Stanford

“For the integration of ultrasound and engineered vesicles in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.”

IEEE CLEDO BRUNETTI AWARD

Sponsor: Brunetti Bequest

JESUS DEL ALAMO

MIT

“For leadership in and contributions to InGaAs- and GaN-based field-effect transistor technology.”

IEEE ELECTRONIC PACKAGING AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Electronic Packaging Society

CHIN C. LEE

University of California, Irvine

“For contributions to new silver alloys, new bonding methods, flip-chip interconnect, and education for electronics packaging.”

IEEE CONTROL SYSTEMS AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Control Systems Society

HIDENORI KIMURA

Systems Innovation Center
Tokyo

“For contributions to synthesis theory of control systems and its applications to manufacturing devices and systems.”

IEEE ELECTROMAGNETICS AWARD

Sponsors: IEEE Antennas and Propagation, Electromagnetic Compatibility, Microwave Theory and Techniques, and Geoscience and Remote Sensingsocieties

CONSTANTINE A. BALANIS

Arizona State University
Tempe

“For contributions to electromagnetics through excellence in book authorship, teaching, and antenna research.”

IEEE JAMES L. FLANAGAN SPEECH AND AUDIO PROCESSING AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Signal Processing Society

DAVID NAHAMOO

Pryon Inc.
Raleigh, N.C.

“For contributions to and leadership in research and deployment of spoken-language technologies.”

IEEE FOURIER AWARD FOR SIGNAL PROCESSING

Sponsors: IEEE Circuits and Systems and the IEEE Signal Processing societies

K. J. RAY LIU

University of Maryland
College Park

“For outstanding leadership in and pioneering contributions to signal processing for wireless sensing and communications.”

IEEE ANDREW S. GROVE AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Electron Devices Society

Corecipients:

HIDEAKI AOCHI

Kioxia Corp.
Kanagawa, Japan

RYOTA KATSUMATA

Kioxia Corp.
Mie, Japan

MASARU KITO

Kioxia Corp.
Mie, Japan

“For pioneering and sustained contributions to high-density, three-dimensional flash memory.”

IEEE HERMAN HALPERIN ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION AWARD

Sponsor: The Robert and Ruth Halperin Foundation, in memory of Herman and Edna Halperin, and the IEEE Power & Energy Society

BRIAN STOTT

Stott, Inc.
Scottsdale, Ariz.

“For contributions to the development and application of power flow and optimal power flow analysis.”

IEEE MASARU IBUKA CONSUMER ELECTRONICS AWARD

Sponsor: Sony Corp.

STEVE WOZNIAK

Woz Speaks
Los Gatos, Calif.

“For pioneering the design of consumer-friendly personal computers.”

IEEE RICHARD HAROLD KAUFMANN AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Industry Applications Society

STEPHEN MCARTHUR

University of Strathclyde
Glasgow, Scotland

“For innovative contributions to the advancement of intelligent systems for power engineering applications.”

IEEE JOSEPH F. KEITHLEY AWARD IN INSTRUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT

Sponsors: Keithley Instruments, a Tektronix Co., and the IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society

Corecipients:

ERIC W. STRID

Board of Directors of Power Oregon, retired
White Salmon, Wash.

K. REED GLEASON

Form Factor, Inc.
Livermore, Calif.

“For contributions to RF microprobing measurement techniques enabling accurate on-wafer circuit testing.”

IEEE GUSTAV ROBERT KIRCHHOFF AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Circuits and Systems Society

THOMAS H. LEE

Stanford

“For pioneering CMOS technology for high-performance wireless circuits and systems.”

IEEE LEON K. KIRCHMAYER GRADUATE TEACHING AWARD

Sponsor: Leon K. Kirchmayer Memorial Fund

ANDREA GOLDSMITH

Princeton

“For educating, developing, guiding, and energizing generations of highly successful students and postdoctoral fellows.”

IEEE KOJI KOBAYASHI COMPUTERS AND COMMUNICATIONS AWARD

Sponsor: NEC Corp.

HARI BALAKRISHNAN

MIT

“For broad contributions to computer networking and mobile and wireless systems.”

IEEE WILLIAM E. NEWELL POWER ELECTRONICS AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Power Electronics Society

ROBERT W. ERICKSON

University of Colorado at Boulder

“For contributions to power electronics education and analysis, modeling, and design of power converters.”

IEEE DONALD O. PEDERSON AWARD IN SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS

Sponsor: IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society

A. PAUL BROKAW

Analog Devices, Inc., retired
Tucson, Ariz.

“For leadership in the design of voltage references, amplifiers, and power management, and for contributions to the principles of analog circuit design.”

IEEE PHOTONICS AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Photonics Society

JACK JEWELL

Consultant
Boulder, Colo.

“For seminal and sustained contributions to the development and commercialization of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL).”

IEEE ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Robotics and Automation Society

Co-recipients:

TOMAS LOZANO-PEREZ

MIT

JEAN-CLAUDE LATOMBE

Stanford

“For foundational contributions to robot motion planning and visionary leadership of the field.”

IEEE FRANK ROSENBLATT AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Computational Intelligence Society

JIM KELLER

University of Missouri, retired
Columbia

“For fundamental work on fuzzy pattern recognition, fuzzy clustering, and fuzzy technologies in computer vision.”

IEEE MARIE SKLODOWSKA-CURIE AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society

MICHEL DEFRISE

Vrije Universiteit Brussel, retired
Belgium

“For key developments in image reconstruction for positron emission tomography and x-ray computed tomography.”

IEEE INNOVATION IN SOCIETAL INFRASTRUCTURE AWARD

Sponsors: Hitachi and the IEEE Computer Society

ELISA BERTINO

Purdue University
West Lafayette, Ind.

“For advancing the security and privacy of new-generation cellular networks.”

IEEE CHARLES PROTEUS STEINMETZ AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Standards Association

HARAN KARMAKER

TECO Westinghouse Motor Co.
Round Rock, Texas

“For leadership in and contributions to the development of standards for electrical machines.”

IEEE ERIC E. SUMNER AWARD

Sponsor: Nokia Bell Labs

EN-HUI YANG

University of Waterloo
Ont., Canada

“For contributions to the theory and practice of source coding.”

IEEE NIKOLA TESLA AWARD

Sponsors: Wolong Electric Group, IEEE Industry Applications and the IEEE Power & Energy societies

ZI-QIANG ZHU

University of Sheffield
South Yorkshire, England

“For contributions to the design, modeling, control, and application of ac permanent magnet machines and drives.”

IEEE KIYO TOMIYASU AWARD

Sponsors: The late Dr. Kiyo Tomiyasu and the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing and the Microwave Theory and Techniques societies

ZHU HAN

University of Houston

“For contributions to game theory and distributed management of autonomous communication networks.”

IEEE TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES AWARD

Sponsors: IEEE Industry Applications, Industrial Electronics, Intelligent Transportation Systems, Microwave Theory and Techniques, Power Electronics, Power & Energy, and Vehicular Technology societies

PHILIP T. KREIN

Zhejiang University
Haining, Zhejiang, China

“For contributions to electric vehicle battery management and hybrid system optimization.”

IEEE UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING AWARD

Sponsor: IEEE Education Society

CRISTIANE A. PIMENTEL

Federal University of Recôncavo da Bahia
Feira de Santana, Brazil

“For encouraging women to pursue STEM careers, and developing industry-based projects for social justice.”

For additional information on the recipients and the awards process, visit the IEEE Awards website.

Lynn Frassetti is the senior awards presentation and communications specialist for IEEE Awards Activities.

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The Inner Beauty of Basic Electronics

Open Circuits showcases the surprising complexity of passive components

5 min read
Vertical
A photo of a high-stability film resistor with the letters "MIS" in yellow.
All photos by Eric Schlaepfer & Windell H. Oskay
Blue

Eric Schlaepfer was trying to fix a broken piece of test equipment when he came across the cause of the problem—a troubled tantalum capacitor. The component had somehow shorted out, and he wanted to know why. So he polished it down for a look inside. He never found the source of the short, but he and his collaborator, Windell H. Oskay, discovered something even better: a breathtaking hidden world inside electronics. What followed were hours and hours of polishing, cleaning, and photography that resulted in Open Circuits: The Inner Beauty of Electronic Components (No Starch Press, 2022), an excerpt of which follows. As the authors write, everything about these components is deliberately designed to meet specific technical needs, but that design leads to “accidental beauty: the emergent aesthetics of things you were never expected to see.”

From a book that spans the wide world of electronics, what we at IEEE Spectrum found surprisingly compelling were the insides of things we don’t spend much time thinking about, passive components. Transistors, LEDs, and other semiconductors may be where the action is, but the simple physics of resistors, capacitors, and inductors have their own sort of splendor.

High-Stability Film Resistor

A photo of a high-stability film resistor with the letters "MIS" in yellow.

All photos by Eric Schlaepfer & Windell H. Oskay

This high-stability film resistor, about 4 millimeters in diameter, is made in much the same way as its inexpensive carbon-film cousin, but with exacting precision. A ceramic rod is coated with a fine layer of resistive film (thin metal, metal oxide, or carbon) and then a perfectly uniform helical groove is machined into the film.

Instead of coating the resistor with an epoxy, it’s hermetically sealed in a lustrous little glass envelope. This makes the resistor more robust, ideal for specialized cases such as precision reference instrumentation, where long-term stability of the resistor is critical. The glass envelope provides better isolation against moisture and other environmental changes than standard coatings like epoxy.

15-Turn Trimmer Potentiometer

A photo of a blue chip
A photo of a blue chip on a circuit board.

It takes 15 rotations of an adjustment screw to move a 15-turn trimmer potentiometer from one end of its resistive range to the other. Circuits that need to be adjusted with fine resolution control use this type of trimmer pot instead of the single-turn variety.

The resistive element in this trimmer is a strip of cermet—a composite of ceramic and metal—silk-screened on a white ceramic substrate. Screen-printed metal links each end of the strip to the connecting wires. It’s a flattened, linear version of the horseshoe-shaped resistive element in single-turn trimmers.

Turning the adjustment screw moves a plastic slider along a track. The wiper is a spring finger, a spring-loaded metal contact, attached to the slider. It makes contact between a metal strip and the selected point on the strip of resistive film.

Ceramic Disc Capacitor

A cutaway of a Ceramic Disc Capacitor
A photo of a Ceramic Disc Capacitor

Capacitors are fundamental electronic components that store energy in the form of static electricity. They’re used in countless ways, including for bulk energy storage, to smooth out electronic signals, and as computer memory cells. The simplest capacitor consists of two parallel metal plates with a gap between them, but capacitors can take many forms so long as there are two conductive surfaces, called electrodes, separated by an insulator.

A ceramic disc capacitor is a low-cost capacitor that is frequently found in appliances and toys. Its insulator is a ceramic disc, and its two parallel plates are extremely thin metal coatings that are evaporated or sputtered onto the disc’s outer surfaces. Connecting wires are attached using solder, and the whole assembly is dipped into a porous coating material that dries hard and protects the capacitor from damage.

Film Capacitor

An image of a cut away of a capacitor
A photo of a green capacitor.

Film capacitors are frequently found in high-quality audio equipment, such as headphone amplifiers, record players, graphic equalizers, and radio tuners. Their key feature is that the dielectric material is a plastic film, such as polyester or polypropylene.

The metal electrodes of this film capacitor are vacuum-deposited on the surfaces of long strips of plastic film. After the leads are attached, the films are rolled up and dipped into an epoxy that binds the assembly together. Then the completed assembly is dipped in a tough outer coating and marked with its value.

Other types of film capacitors are made by stacking flat layers of metallized plastic film, rather than rolling up layers of film.

Dipped Tantalum Capacitor

A photo of a cutaway of a Dipped Tantalum Capacitor

At the core of this capacitor is a porous pellet of tantalum metal. The pellet is made from tantalum powder and sintered, or compressed at a high temperature, into a dense, spongelike solid.

Just like a kitchen sponge, the resulting pellet has a high surface area per unit volume. The pellet is then anodized, creating an insulating oxide layer with an equally high surface area. This process packs a lot of capacitance into a compact device, using spongelike geometry rather than the stacked or rolled layers that most other capacitors use.

The device’s positive terminal, or anode, is connected directly to the tantalum metal. The negative terminal, or cathode, is formed by a thin layer of conductive manganese dioxide coating the pellet.

Axial Inductor

An image of a cutaway of a Axial Inductor
A photo of a collection of cut wires

Inductors are fundamental electronic components that store energy in the form of a magnetic field. They’re used, for example, in some types of power supplies to convert between voltages by alternately storing and releasing energy. This energy-efficient design helps maximize the battery life of cellphones and other portable electronics.

Inductors typically consist of a coil of insulated wire wrapped around a core of magnetic material like iron or ferrite, a ceramic filled with iron oxide. Current flowing around the core produces a magnetic field that acts as a sort of flywheel for current, smoothing out changes in the current as it flows through the inductor.

This axial inductor has a number of turns of varnished copper wire wrapped around a ferrite form and soldered to copper leads on its two ends. It has several layers of protection: a clear varnish over the windings, a light-green coating around the solder joints, and a striking green outer coating to protect the whole component and provide a surface for the colorful stripes that indicate its inductance value.

Power Supply Transformer

A photo of a collection of cut wires
A photo of a yellow element on a circuit board.

This transformer has multiple sets of windings and is used in a power supply to create multiple output AC voltages from a single AC input such as a wall outlet.

The small wires nearer the center are “high impedance” turns of magnet wire. These windings carry a higher voltage but a lower current. They’re protected by several layers of tape, a copper-foil electrostatic shield, and more tape.

The outer “low impedance” windings are made with thicker insulated wire and fewer turns. They handle a lower voltage but a higher current.

All of the windings are wrapped around a black plastic bobbin. Two pieces of ferrite ceramic are bonded together to form the magnetic core at the heart of the transformer.

This article appears in the February 2023 print issue.

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