Image of Bitcoin and Ethereum, two different cryptocurrencies.
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A number of men in suits standing at a table talking.From left: IEEE San Diego Blockchain local group cochair Ken Miyachi discussing policies regarding blockchain technology with University of San Diego law professor David Brennan at the 19 June networking event.Photo: Cazares Films

THE INSTITUTE Blockchain technology, best known as the foundation of cryptocurrency transactions, has the potential to replace existing databases, providing more transparency and security. Just about every industry, including energy, finance, and health care, is looking into how it can adopt blockchain’s decentralized ledger.

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The Day the U.S. TV Industry Died

Why the last major U.S. television set maker, Zenith, finally gave up

15 min read
Man in white coveralls holding cathode ray tube surrounded by industrial equipment
Michael L. Abramson/Getty Images

Driven finally into unprofitability in its traditional market by ever stiffer competition from abroad, harmed rather than helped by a decade of economizing cutbacks in research and development, Zenith Electronics Corp.—the sole surviving U.S. manufacturer of television receivers—reportedly plans to call it quits in the business it helped to create and nourish through some 40 years of innovation.

Indeed, nothing so neatly reflects the company’s present situation as its latest and arguably its second greatest innovation: a flat shadow mask for a flat-faced cathode ray tube hailed everywhere as a major breakthrough. Announced in 1986, the Flat Tension Mask, as it is called, increases the brightness of the cathode ray tube by up to 80 percent, its contrast ratio by up to 70 percent, and its resolution by up to 15 percent over current tube designs, which use a curved face plate and curved shadow mask. The flat mask is stretched so tight that it can maintain color quality even when heated unevenly by high concentrations of electrons in bright areas of the picture.

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