Video Friday: Dog-E

Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos

2 min read
Picture of a small colorful robot dog with wheels for feet with its nose being booped by a young girl

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your friends at IEEE Spectrum robotics. We also post a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months. Please send us your events for inclusion.

ICRA 2023: 29 May–2 June 2023, LONDON
RoboCup 2023: 4–10 July 2023, BORDEAUX, FRANCE
RSS 2023: 10–14 July 2023, DAEGU, KOREA
IEEE RO-MAN 2023: 28–31 August 2023, BUSAN, KOREA

Enjoy today’s videos!

Meet Dog-E, the One in a Million Robot Dog!

Uncrate this pup to reveal a unique combination of colorful lights, sounds and personality traits, so no two Dog-Es are ever the same! Unique movements, personality and sounds brings this robot dog to life, and Dog-E’s personality influences how it behaves and responds to you with over 200 sounds and reactions. Dog-E talks with its tail, using persistence of vision (POV) technology to communicate with you. Train your Dog-E to learn your name and do tricks, track its needs or even toss it a treat! Multiple people can mint, save and load unique profiles with the app, so Dog-E is a robot dog for the whole family!

[ WowWee ]

The average human spends 26 years sleeping and 30 years working. That leaves just 1–2 hours in a day to truly connect with family, elders, or pets—if we’re lucky. With all that time apart and no one there to supervise, there can be a lot of concern about the health and safety of our loved ones. This is why we created EBO X—not just for you but for ourselves as well.

[ Ebo X ]

Labrador Systems is at CES this week, demonstrating its Retriever robot, now with Amazon Echo integration.

[ Labrador ]

With a wrap-up of the main events that marked 2022 for us, the RSL team wishes you a happy and eventful 2023.

[ RSL ]

What if you could walk way faster without trying any harder? Moonwalkers basically put an electric moving sidewalk right under your feet. WIRED’s Brent Rose has some questions: Are they real? Are they safe? Are they actually any good? Brent goes inside Shift Robotics’ research and development lab to get some answers.

[ Wired ]

How Wing designs its delivery drones.

[ Wing ]

Breaking news: Robot passes mirror test.

[ Sanctuary AI ]

The Guardian XM intelligent manipulator offers speed, dexterity, precision, and strength in a compact, lightweight package. With six degrees of freedom, an optimized strength-to-weight ratio, embedded intelligence, and a sleek hardware design that can withstand extreme temperatures and environmental conditions (IP66), the Guardian robotic arm can be used for a variety of complex outdoor and indoor applications.

[ Sarcos ]

A custom, closed-course testing fortress and an urban, high-speed proving ground? Yeah, you could say we take our structured testing seriously. Experience how we put the WaymoDriver to the test at each of our state-of-the-art facilities.

[ Waymo ]

Skydio, the leading American drone manufacturer, believes the responsible use of drones is the core of any public safety mission and we bake responsible engagement into our DNA. We developed the Skydio Engagement and Responsible Use Principles—a groundbreaking set of policy and ethical principles to guide our work and drive the industry forward. We also partnered with DRONERESPONDERS—the leading association focused on first-responder drone programs—to develop the “Five C’s” of responsible drone use by public-safety agencies.

Of course, Skydio’s drones are a lot of fun for nonemergencies, too:

[ Skydio ]

The Conversation (2)
FB TS07 Jan, 2023
INDV

Realize that any giving time countless pets all over the world are suffering because of mistreatment/neglect & it will always continue as long as humanity keeps using animals as pets!

What gives humanity right to enslave any animals for entertainment as toys?

Also consider countless diseases/parasites keep jumping between humans & their pets!

& massive amounts of money/labor/food/medicine keep getting wasted for pets!

& invasive species problems & harms of international pet (wild animal) trade!

People who are addicted to pets (because of growing up w/ pets and/or living w/ pets for many years) should/must switch to robopets!!

1 Reply

The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
Horizontal
A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
DarkGray

In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

Keep Reading ↓Show less