The August 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

Close bar

U.S. Tech Salaries Climb, Says 2021 Report

Engineers got the biggest raises in Charlotte, Orlando, and New York City

1 min read
man leaning on coins
Illustration: iStockphoto

The average increase in U.S. tech salaries of 3.6 percent between late 2019 and late 2020 may not sound dramatic. But compared with recent trends in tech salaries, it’s a significant jump—especially considering the complicating factor of the COVID-19 pandemic and its attendant spike in remote work and office routine disruption. The increase is also particularly notable after 2017, 2018, and 2019 brought annual increases of less than a percent.

This 3.6 increase—for an average total of $97,859—is the number job search firm Dice found when it surveyed 9,143 job seekers between 29 September and 9 December 2020. The company runs a survey annually, generally getting around 10,000 responses.

chart

According to the Dice 2021 Tech Salary Report, U.S. Salaries in most tech hubs registered increases, with the exception of the Pacific Northwest, Tampa, and Chicago. The biggest jump? Charlotte, NC.

Salaries in Silicon Valley climbed 2.4 percent, keeping the region solidly on top at $126,801 (without adjustments for cost of living).

The top ten in each category, below. The complete report is available here.

chart

Where the Biggest Raises Were

RankCity or Metro AreaAverage Increase 2020 over 2019Average Tech Salary 2020
1Charlotte, N.C.13.8$99,691
2Orlando, Fla.13.4$88,598
3New York City11.6$114,274
4Austin9.7$104,344
5Philadelphia8.3$96,512
6Detroit7.7$90,110
7Phoenix7.6$95,514
8Houston7.1$99,727
9Minneapolis6.6$102,341
10Baltimore/D.C.5.5$109,525

Source: Dice

The Conversation (0)

Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

His pivot from defense helped a tiny tuning-fork prevent SUV rollovers and plane crashes

11 min read
Vertical
Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

In 1992, Asad M. Madni sat at the helm of BEI Sensors and Controls, overseeing a product line that included a variety of sensor and inertial-navigation devices, but its customers were less varied—mainly, the aerospace and defense electronics industries.

And he had a problem.

The Cold War had ended, crashing the U.S. defense industry. And business wasn’t going to come back anytime soon. BEI needed to identify and capture new customers—and quickly.

Keep Reading ↓Show less
{"imageShortcodeIds":[]}