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Special Report: CESAsia 2015

The latest on consumer electronics from Shanghai with twice daily updates from our CES ninja, Stephen Cass

2 min read
Special Report: CESAsia 2015

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From May 26 to 28, we’ll be bringing you coverage of CES Asia, direct from the show floor in Shanghai. This is the first year of CES Asia, a spin off of CES International—the monster January conference and exhibition in Las Vegas. With 250 exhibitors that will include some of the biggest names in China and beyond, we’ll have the latest news in technologies such as mobile, Internet of Things, wearable, video and display, robotics, and more.

Because of the 12-hour time difference between IEEE Spectrum’s New York City offices and Shanghai, rather than live blogging, we’ll have twice daily dispatches covering key events and must-sees from the previous day.

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Practical Solid-State Batteries Using Pressure

Mechanical stress exploits workaround to electrochemical failure

4 min read
Illustration shows a grey disk  with two metal circles on each end and a thin piece of metal attached to each. Thin grey strips branch out of one of them. Above and below the disk are illustrative red arrows facing the disk.

Researchers solved a problem facing solid-state lithium batteries, which can be shorted out by dendrites, metal filaments that cross the gap between metal electrodes. They found that applying a compression force across a solid electrolyte material [gray disk] caused the dendrite [dark line at left] to stop moving from one electrode toward the other [the round metallic patches at each side] and instead veer harmlessly sideways, toward the direction of the force.

MIT

Solid-state lithium-ion batteries promise to be more safe, lightweight, and compact than their conventional counterparts. However, metal spikes can grow inside them, leading to short-circuit breakdowns. Now a new study finds that applying pressure on these batteries may be a simple way to prevent such failures.

Conventional batteries supply electricity via chemical reactions between two electrodes, the anode and cathode, which typically interact through liquid or gel electrolytes. Solid-state batteries instead employ solid electrolytes such as ceramics.

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IEEE President’s Note: Looking to 2050 and Beyond

The importance of future-proofing IEEE

4 min read
Photo of K. J. Ray Liu
IEEE

What will the future of the world look like? Everything in the world evolves. Therefore, IEEE also must evolve, not only to survive but to thrive.

How will people build communities and engage with one another and with IEEE in the future? How will knowledge be acquired? How will content be curated, shared, and accessed? What issues will influence the development of technical standards? How should IEEE be organized to be most impactful?

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Get the Rohde & Schwarz EMI White Paper

Learn how to measure and reduce common mode electromagnetic interference (EMI) in electric drive installations

1 min read
Rohde & Schwarz

Nowadays, electric machines are often driven by power electronic converters. Even though the use of converters brings with it a variety of advantages, common mode (CM) signals are a frequent problem in many installations. Common mode voltages induced by the converter drive common mode currents damage the motor bearings over time and significantly reduce the lifetime of the drive.

Download this free whitepaper now!

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