Smart Parking Systems Make It Easier to Find a Parking Space

From an airport system that directs drivers toward open spaces to cities' replacing meters with pay stations, technology is changing the way we park

5 min read

”Parking is the industry that everyone hates,” says Kim Jackson, executive director of the International Parking Institute, in Fredericksburg, Va. ”But we’re the industry that…no one functions if we’re not there.”

The industry is there—on the streets and in our pockets—in a big way: it employs more than 1 million people and generates about US $27.5 billion in annual revenue in the United States alone, according to Jackson. And now the industry is undergoing a revolution, applying new technology to achieve municipal and corporate objectives.

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A photo shows separated components of the axial flux motor in the order in which they appear in the finished motor.
INFINITUM ELECTRIC
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The heart of any electric motor consists of a rotor that revolves around a stationary part, called a stator. The stator, traditionally made of iron, tends to be heavy. Stator iron accounts for about two-thirds of the weight of a conventional motor. To lighten the stator, some people proposed making it out of a printed circuit board.

Although the idea of replacing a hunk of iron with a lightweight, ultrathin, easy-to-make, long-lasting PCB was attractive from the outset, it didn’t gain widespread adoption in its earliest applications inside lawn equipment and wind turbines a little over a decade ago. Now, though, the PCB stator is getting a new lease on life. Expect it to save weight and thus energy in just about everything that uses electricity to impart motive force.

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