The August 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

Close bar

Robert Malkin: MacGyvering Medical Gear

He is inspiring students to tackle urgent problems in the developing world

5 min read
Robert Malkin: MacGyvering Medical Gear
Photo: D. L. Anderson

It’s 1989. Five years after earning his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering, Robert Malkin is designing cardiac pacemakers in Switzerland. It’s an important job, and he’s developing deep expertise and earning good money. But he’s unhappy. Very unhappy. “I decided I didn’t want to be an engineer,” he says. “Actually, I didn’t want to work anymore, period. I had a party, burned my time card, and disappeared into the sunset.”

Disappeared into the sunrise is more like it. Malkin headed southeast to Thailand, where he signed up with a YMCA-sponsored team that was trying to get poor Thai parents to stop selling their daughters into that country’s booming sex trade. “It was more or less sexual slavery,” says Malkin. “Despite being immoral and illegal, it was happening in large numbers.”

Keep reading...Show less

This article is for IEEE members only. Join IEEE to access our full archive.

Join the world’s largest professional organization devoted to engineering and applied sciences and get access to all of Spectrum’s articles, podcasts, and special reports. Learn more →

If you're already an IEEE member, please sign in to continue reading.

Membership includes:

  • Get unlimited access to IEEE Spectrum content
  • Follow your favorite topics to create a personalized feed of IEEE Spectrum content
  • Save Spectrum articles to read later
  • Network with other technology professionals
  • Establish a professional profile
  • Create a group to share and collaborate on projects
  • Discover IEEE events and activities
  • Join and participate in discussions

iRobot CEO Colin Angle on Data Privacy and Robots in the Home

In light of Amazon's recent acquisition, we revisit our 7 September 2017 Q&A with iRobot's CEO

8 min read
iRobot CEO Colin Angle.
iRobot CEO Colin Angle.
Photo: iRobot

Editor's note: Last week, Amazon announced that it was acquiring iRobot for $1.7 billion, prompting questions about how iRobot's camera-equipped robot vacuums will protect the data that they collect about your home. In September of 2017, we spoke with iRobot CEO Colin Angle about iRobot's approach to data privacy, directly addressing many similar concerns. "The views expressed in the Q&A from 2017 remain true," iRobot told us. "Over the past several years, iRobot has continued to do more to strengthen, and clearly define, its stance on privacy and security. It’s important to note that iRobot takes product security and customer privacy very seriously. We know our customers invite us into their most personal spaces—their homes—because they trust that our products will help them do more. We take that trust seriously."

Story from 7 September 2017 follows:

Keep Reading ↓Show less

New EV Prototype Leaves Range Anxiety in the Dust

Mercedes-Benz’s Vision EQXX completed a record-breaking 747-mile run in May

5 min read
a silver car driving down the road with a mountain of switchbacks behind it

The Mercedes-Benz Vision EQXX

Mercedes-Benz

Not long ago, a 300-mile range seemed like a healthy target for electric cars. More recently, the 520-mile (837-kilometer) Lucid Air became the world’s longest-range EV. But that record may not stand for long.

The Mercedes-Benz Vision EQXX, and its showroom-bound tech, looks to banish range anxiety for good: In April, the sleek prototype sedan completed a 621-mile (1,000-km) trek through the Alps from Mercedes’s Sindelfingen facility to the Côte d’Azur in Cassis, France, with battery juice to spare. It built on that feat in late May, when the prototype covered a world-beating, bladder-busting 747 miles (1,202 km) in a run from Germany to the Formula One circuit in Silverstone, England.

Keep Reading ↓Show less

Modeling Microfluidic Organ-on-a-Chip Devices

Register for this webinar to enhance your modeling and design processes for microfluidic organ-on-a-chip devices using COMSOL Multiphysics

1 min read
Comsol Logo
Comsol

If you want to enhance your modeling and design processes for microfluidic organ-on-a-chip devices, tune into this webinar.

You will learn methods for simulating the performance and behavior of microfluidic organ-on-a-chip devices and microphysiological systems in COMSOL Multiphysics. Additionally, you will see how to couple multiple physical effects in your model, including chemical transport, particle tracing, and fluid–structure interaction. You will also learn how to distill simulation output to find key design parameters and obtain a high-level description of system performance and behavior.

Keep Reading ↓Show less