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Private-sector Greenhouse Gas Monitoring

Weather company enters into agreement with Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1 min read
Private-sector Greenhouse Gas Monitoring

AWS Convergence Technology, a Maryland-based company that operates weather monitoring stations, announced last week it would deploy a network of 150 greenhouse gas sensor stations to monitor regional emissions. AWS, known for its WeatherBug app, has renamed itself Earth Networks. The system will be built and operated in partnership with Scripps Institution of Oceanography, which will use its data in research. Consisting initially of 100 stations in the United States, 25 in Europe, and 25 other places in the world, the network  is meant to determine more accurately where emissions are originating, how they circulate in the atmosphere, and how their levels fluctuate regionally.

As explained by Katie Fehrenbacher of Earth2Tech, the sensors themselves will be provided by Picarro, "a Sunnyvale, Calif.-based startup that sells $50,000 greenhouse gas-detecting sensor boxes. The analyzers are about the size of a desktop PC, and they work by firing laser beams into the air to determine concentrations of green house gases, and then measure the changes in wavelength signals. While the technology has existed in labs for decades, Picarro has stuffed all this measuring capability into a portable, 58-pound box of sensors that requires little maintenance."

Scripps Director Tony Haymet says that regional GHG emissions are of vital interest, with California and the U.S. Northeast launching carbon trading systems. Reported emissions are not reliable, he says, and can vary by a factor of as much as four.
"If there were every a global trading scheme for carbon," he says, "we are positioned to be the 'SEC' of that market. We could be the regulator of a $1 trillion market."

The Conversation (0)
This photograph shows a car with the words “We Drive Solar” on the door, connected to a charging station. A windmill can be seen in the background.

The Dutch city of Utrecht is embracing vehicle-to-grid technology, an example of which is shown here—an EV connected to a bidirectional charger. The historic Rijn en Zon windmill provides a fitting background for this scene.

We Drive Solar

Hundreds of charging stations for electric vehicles dot Utrecht’s urban landscape in the Netherlands like little electric mushrooms. Unlike those you may have grown accustomed to seeing, many of these stations don’t just charge electric cars—they can also send power from vehicle batteries to the local utility grid for use by homes and businesses.

Debates over the feasibility and value of such vehicle-to-grid technology go back decades. Those arguments are not yet settled. But big automakers like Volkswagen, Nissan, and Hyundai have moved to produce the kinds of cars that can use such bidirectional chargers—alongside similar vehicle-to-home technology, whereby your car can power your house, say, during a blackout, as promoted by Ford with its new F-150 Lightning. Given the rapid uptake of electric vehicles, many people are thinking hard about how to make the best use of all that rolling battery power.

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