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Polymer Embedded With Metallic Nanoparticles Enables Soft Robotics

New production technique for nanoparticle-enabled polymers could lead to better control of soft robots

2 min read
Polymer Embedded With Metallic Nanoparticles Enables Soft Robotics
Images: North Carolina State University

Nanomaterials are increasingly viewed as important ingredients in artificial muscles meant to power different types of robots. Carbon nanotubes have been proposed as well as graphene

Now researchers at North Carolina State University (NCSU), in Raleigh, have developed a technique for embedding nanoparticles of magnetite—an iron oxide—into a polymer so that when the material comes near a magnetic field the polymer moves. The researchers believe that the nanoparticle-studded polymer could lead to a method of remotely controlling so-called “soft robots” whose flexible components allow them to move around in tight spaces in a manner reminiscent of octopodes.

In research described in a paper published in the journal Nanoscale, the NCSU researchers describe a process that starts with dispersing the nanoparticles in a solvent. Next, a polymer is dissolved into the mixture and the resulting fluid is poured into a mold. Then a magnetic field is applied that arranges the magnetite nanoparticles into parallel chains. Once the solution dries in the mold, the chains of nanoparticles are locked into place.

“Using this technique, we can create large nanocomposites, in many different shapes, which can be manipulated remotely,” said Sumeet Mishra, lead author of the paper, in a press release. “The nanoparticle chains give us an enhanced response, and by controlling the strength and direction of the magnetic field, you can control the extent and direction of the movements of soft robots.”

You can see the movement of the polymer under the influence of a magnetic field in the video below.

The phenomenon that causes the polymer to react so strongly to the magnetic field is something called magnetic anisotropy; it makes the material’s magnetic properties directionally dependent. This is achieved by assembling the nanoparticles into chains.

“The key here is that the nanoparticles in the chains and their magnetic dipoles are arranged head-to-tail, with the positive end of one magnetic nanoparticle lined up with the negative end of the next, all the way down the line,” said Joe Tracy, an associate professor at NCSU and corresponding author of the paper, in the press release. “When a magnetic field is applied in any direction, the chain re-orients itself to become as parallel as possible to the magnetic field, limited only by the constraints of gravity and the elasticity of the polymer.”

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The First Million-Transistor Chip: the Engineers’ Story

Intel’s i860 RISC chip was a graphics powerhouse

21 min read
Twenty people crowd into a cubicle, the man in the center seated holding a silicon wafer full of chips

Intel's million-transistor chip development team

In San Francisco on Feb. 27, 1989, Intel Corp., Santa Clara, Calif., startled the world of high technology by presenting the first ever 1-million-transistor microprocessor, which was also the company’s first such chip to use a reduced instruction set.

The number of transistors alone marks a huge leap upward: Intel’s previous microprocessor, the 80386, has only 275,000 of them. But this long-deferred move into the booming market in reduced-instruction-set computing (RISC) was more of a shock, in part because it broke with Intel’s tradition of compatibility with earlier processors—and not least because after three well-guarded years in development the chip came as a complete surprise. Now designated the i860, it entered development in 1986 about the same time as the 80486, the yet-to-be-introduced successor to Intel’s highly regarded 80286 and 80386. The two chips have about the same area and use the same 1-micrometer CMOS technology then under development at the company’s systems production and manufacturing plant in Hillsboro, Ore. But with the i860, then code-named the N10, the company planned a revolution.

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