Loser: Too Little, Too Soon

Samsung’s solid-state disks will be puny, pricey, and impractical

5 min read
Opening illustration for this feature article.
Solid-state flash memories are everywhere. They boot the operating systems in PCs, store photos in digital cameras and music in MP3 players, and let you tote music, photos, and presentations on a key chain. Now Samsung is betting that you’ll be willing to pay hundreds of dollars—and maybe much more—to have a 16- or 32-gigabyte flash-based memory in your notebook computer.
Image: John Weber

Most analysts are nonplussed. “Does Samsung really understand the demographics and the price threshold that people are willing to pay for these products?” asks Celeste Crystal, a senior research analyst with IDC’s Semiconductors Group, headquartered in Framingham, Mass.

While flash memory is ubiquitous these days in devices using 4 GB and less, there are several compelling reasons that you don’t find it in the hard-drive bays of PCs, notebooks, subnotebooks, or tablet computers. For example, flash-based solid-state disks (SSDs) have astronomically high prices and absurdly low capacities relative to conventional magnetic hard drives. SSDs cost 60 to 70 times as much as hard-disk drives, which boast capacities and read/write speeds that flash makers like Samsung aren’t going to approach for at least another three years, industry observers say.

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New AI Speeds Computer Graphics by Up to 5x

Neural rendering harnesses machine learning to paint pixels

5 min read
Four examples of Nvidia's Instant NeRF 2D-to-3D machine learning model placed side-by-side.

Nvidia Instant NeRF uses neural rendering to generate 3D visuals from 2D images.

NVIDIA

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Watch out Tiger Woods, Golfi has a mean short game

4 min read
Golf Robot Learns To Putt Like A Pro

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In this presentation we will build the case for component-based requirements management

2 min read

This is a sponsored article brought to you by 321 Gang.

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