The December 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

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Photo: IEEE WIE

THE INSTITUTEAlthough female engineers have made great strides in the past few decades, the number of them in high-level positions is still low compared with male engineers. Increasing the retention rates of middle- to senior-level women in technology is the goal of this year’s IEEE Women in Engineering International Leadership Conference (WIE ILC), to be held on 23 and 24 May in Austin, Texas.

“The IEEE WIE ILC continues to grow in importance as a unique event with an agenda specifically tailored to help support and sustain women in technology fields around the world,” says IEEE Senior Member Kathy Herring Hayashi, the conference chair.

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The Transistor at 75

The past, present, and future of the modern world’s most important invention

1 min read
A photo of a birthday cake with 75 written on it.
Lisa Sheehan
LightGreen

Seventy-five years is a long time. It’s so long that most of us don’t remember a time before the transistor, and long enough for many engineers to have devoted entire careers to its use and development. In honor of this most important of technological achievements, this issue’s package of articles explores the transistor’s historical journey and potential future.

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