Go Language Tops List of In-Demand Software Skills

Engineers don’t give Go a lot of love, but employers consider it king, says Hired study

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Programmer's text editor showing source code written in the Go programming language.
Photo: Shutterstock

Engineers love Python, JavaScript, and Java. Employers, on the other hand, shine their light on Go.

That’s the takeaway of the Hottest Coding Languages section of job site Hired’s annual State of Software Engineers report. Engineers experienced with Go received an average of 9.2 interview requests, making it the most in-demand language. Worldwide, Go’s popularity among employers was followed by Scala and Ruby. That’s not great news for engineers, who ranked Ruby number one in least loved languages, followed by PHP and Objective-C.

There are regional differences in employer interest. In the San Francisco Bay Area and Toronto, Scala rules; in London, it’s TypeScript. A roundup of regional favorites, along with the worldwide rankings, is in the chart below.

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(To compile its data, Hired reviewed 400,000 interview requests from 10,000 companies made to 98,000 job seekers throughout 2019.)

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Special Report: Top Tech 2021

After months of blood, toil, tears, and sweat, we can all expect a much better year

1 min read
Photo-illustration: Edmon de Haro

Last January in this space we wrote that “technology doesn't really have bad years." But 2020 was like no other year in recent memory: Just about everything suffered, including technology. One shining exception was biotech, with the remarkably rapid development of vaccines capable of stemming the COVID-19 pandemic.

This year's roundup of anticipated tech advances includes an examination of the challenges in manufacturing these vaccines. And it describes how certain technologies used widely during the pandemic will likely have far-reaching effects on society, even after the threat subsides. You'll also find accounts of technical developments unrelated to the pandemic that the editors of IEEE Spectrum expect to generate news this year.

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