EV Battery Swapping's First Real Test

Better Place has completed a trial for taxis in Tokyo

5 min read
 

23 March 2011—Smartphone owners know all about battery anxiety: Spend too long playing games and the battery icon flashes ”empty” the next time you need to make a call. For drivers of electric cars, the problem is more serious: They can’t just walk over with a 20-liter jug of electricity from the nearest charging station, and even if they do manage to glide into a station on their last electrons, it could take hours to top off a car battery.

Silicon Valley start-up Better Place claims it can change all that. Its recent trial in Tokyo allowed drivers to switch batteries at stations in minutes, letting them continue their journey and leaving the recharging to Better Place. The company might also help Japan find something to do with its declining number of gas stations, says Minoru Nakamura, head of the crude oil distribution unit of Japan’s ministry of economy, trade, and industry.

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A photo shows separated components of the axial flux motor in the order in which they appear in the finished motor.
INFINITUM ELECTRIC
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The heart of any electric motor consists of a rotor that revolves around a stationary part, called a stator. The stator, traditionally made of iron, tends to be heavy. Stator iron accounts for about two-thirds of the weight of a conventional motor. To lighten the stator, some people proposed making it out of a printed circuit board.

Although the idea of replacing a hunk of iron with a lightweight, ultrathin, easy-to-make, long-lasting PCB was attractive from the outset, it didn’t gain widespread adoption in its earliest applications inside lawn equipment and wind turbines a little over a decade ago. Now, though, the PCB stator is getting a new lease on life. Expect it to save weight and thus energy in just about everything that uses electricity to impart motive force.

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