Europe’s Smart Highway Will Shepherd Cars From Rotterdam to Vienna

Holland, Germany, and Austria’s Cooperative ITS Corridor is setting standards for the world

8 min read
Europe’s Smart Highway Will Shepherd Cars From Rotterdam to Vienna
Illustration: Matthew Hollister

Seeing taillights flash up ahead, you slam on the brakes, thus sending the signal you’ve just received to the car behind, with a lag. That car relays the same information with a lag of its own, creating a monstrous traffic jam kilometers down the line.

That’s the sorry state of car-to-car communication today. Drivers must be totally alert; yet even so, they can’t help triggering perverse results. This problem will start to end this decade, as cars begin to communicate with one another in a way that allows each to see through the eyes of those that have gone before. The roads will be safer, traffic jams fewer, and cars more autonomous.

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Water Heaters Have Battery Potential

They’re more cost effective for energy storage than electrochemical batteries

3 min read
A water heater in a basement with a fusebox and blue tool box.
iStockphoto

This article is part of our exclusive IEEE Journal Watch series in partnership with IEEE Xplore.

Water heaters are, according to new research, sizing up to be more than just water heaters in the modern, renewably-powered home. They could, in fact, be something closer to a battery.

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Bosch Powers the Automotive Sector Toward an Electrified Future

The German company has optimized three-phase inverters and their DC link capacitors with a simulation-powered design process

8 min read
Digital art showing a 3D transparent car with the electric engine connected to batteries.

The global transition toward electric cars is getting a boost from industry suppliers like Robert Bosch, which provides electrical components and systems to car manufacturers. The Bosch team optimizes three-phase inverters and their DC link capacitors with a simulation-powered design process, which enables them to identify potentially destructive "hot spots" early in the development cycle.

This sponsored article is brought to you by COMSOL.

Just as tourists in Paris are drawn to the Louvre, visitors to Stuttgart, Germany, also flock to museums displaying the great works of the city. Stuttgart may not boast of Degas or Monet, but its prominent names are perhaps even more famous than Paris’ painters: Mercedes–Benz and Porsche. Each of these iconic automakers maintains a museum in the southwestern German city they call home. Their gleaming galleries feature many historic and influential cars, almost all of them powered by petroleum-fueled internal combustion (IC) engines. Looking ahead, Stuttgart will likely continue to be the heart of the German auto industry, but how long will the IC engine remain the heart of the automobile?

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