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Do We Need to Go to the Moon to Get to Mars?

There’s a palpable longing to return to the moon. But does it make sense?

12 min read
Photo of astronaut on Mars.
Photo: NASA

This is part of IEEE Spectrum’s Special Report: Why Mars? Why Now?

Photo of astronaut on Mars.Photo: NASA

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IEEE STEM Activity Kits Are In Demand at 150 U.S. Public Libraries

Kids can build robots, write code, and design video games

4 min read
Two boys and one girl standing in front of a computer monitor. On the left side of the monitor is a backpack containing a science activity kit.

These youngsters are checking out one of their local library’s IEEE-funded science activity kits.

John Zulaski

More than 150 public libraries throughout the central United States now lend out activity kits that let children explore just about any aspect of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The kids can check them out just like they would a book. The kits teach youngsters what engineers do, as well as how to code, build robots, design video games, and create animations.

The collections have been made possible by the IEEE Region 4 Science Kits for Public Libraries program with funding from Region 4 members and corporate sponsors. The SKPL program is the brainchild of IEEE Life Senior Member John A. Zulaski, the chair of the SKPL committee.

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Toe-tapping Test for Parkinson’s

Assesses risk of falling

2 min read
A person sits in a chair with their feet on sensing boards while looking at instructions on a computer monitor.
Rui Hua

When someone is faced with mobility challenges, the risk of falling and injuring oneself increases. This is the case for people living with Parkinson’s disease, a brain disorder that results in uncontrollable movements, such as shaking, and impaired balance and coordination.

Ya Wang, an associate professor at Texas A&M University, and her colleagues has been exploring a novel way to assess the risk of someone with Parkinson’s disease in falling. Their proposed approach involves a smart insole that’s inserted into the user’s shoes and tracks their foot movements while they tap their toes, and is described in a recent study published 5 May 2022 in IEEE Sensors Letters.

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Take the Lead on Satellite Design Using Digital Engineering

Learn how to accelerate your satellite design process and reduce risk and costs with model-based engineering methods

1 min read
Keysight
Keysight

Win the race to design and deploy satellite technologies and systems. Learn how new digital engineering techniques can accelerate development and reduce your risk and costs. Download this free whitepaper now!

Our white paper covers:

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