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Demand and Salaries for Data Scientists Continue to Climb

Data-science job openings are expanding faster than the number of technologists looking for them, says job-search firm Indeed

2 min read
Illustration of data scientists
Illustration: iStockphoto

Back in August, a LinkedIn analysis concluded that the United States is facing a significant shortage of data scientists, a big change from a surplus in 2015. This week, job-search firm Indeed reported that its data indicates the shortage is getting worse: While more job seekers are interested in data-science jobs, the number of job postings from employers has been rising faster than the number of interested applicants.

According to Indeed, job postings for data scientists as a share of all postings were up 29 percent in December 2018 compared with December 2017, while searches were only up around 14 percent.

“The bargaining power in data science remains with the job seekers,” Andrew Flowers, Indeed economist, stated in a press release.

What exactly are data scientists? Indeed indicated that people working as data scientists typically have degrees in computer science, statistics, or a quantitative social science, along with some training in statistical modeling, machine learning, and programming.

Salaries for data scientists are up as well. Average salary in the area surrounding Houston, which topped the 2018 list when adjusted for the cost of living, climbed 16.5 percent since 2017, while the average salary in the San Francisco Bay Area, No. 2 on the adjusted list, jumped 13.7 percent over Indeed’s 2017 numbers. Only the Washington, D.C., area saw a drop. The table below shows average salaries, both raw and adjusted, for the most active regions, and the percent change in raw salaries since a year ago.

Salaries for Data Scientists

LocationAverage salary (with cost of living adjustment), 2018Average salary (no adjustment), 2018Percent change since 2017
Houston-Woodlands-Sugarland, Texas$123,010$137,64816.5%
San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, Calif.$121,193$166,51913.7%
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, Wash.$119,141$146,08813.7%
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Ga.$110,171$117,00212.7%
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif.$109,668$153,5353.8%
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Conn.$109,179$144,444NA
New York-Newark-Jersey City, N.Y./N.J.$108,681$146,0677.5%
Boston-Cambridge-Newton, Mass./N.H.$108,596$132,9226.3%
Austin-Round Rock, Texas$108,410$119,3595.8%
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin Ill./Ind,/Wis.$108,141$123,71315.8%
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, Calif.$105,355$136,6453.0%
Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington Pa./N.J./Del./Md.$104,991$122,5243.6%
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas$104,947$115,86217.2%
St Louis, Mo.$103,694$103,7983.8%
San Diego-Carlsbad, Calif.$99,852$127,910NA
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria D.C./Va./Md./W.Va.$99,255$130,222-5.6%
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa$98,021$102,138NA
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Md.$95,751$113,178NA
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Fla.$86,543$95,111NA
Source: Indeed.com
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Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

His pivot from defense helped a tiny tuning-fork prevent SUV rollovers and plane crashes

11 min read
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Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

In 1992, Asad M. Madni sat at the helm of BEI Sensors and Controls, overseeing a product line that included a variety of sensor and inertial-navigation devices, but its customers were less varied—mainly, the aerospace and defense electronics industries.

And he had a problem.

The Cold War had ended, crashing the U.S. defense industry. And business wasn’t going to come back anytime soon. BEI needed to identify and capture new customers—and quickly.

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