The December 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

Close bar

COMSOL, a leading provider of software solutions for multiphysics modeling, simulation, and application deployment, has published a special edition of its annual publication, COMSOL News, celebrating simulation specialists working in the field of acoustics.

COMSOL, a leading provider of software solutions for multiphysics modeling, simulation, and application deployment, has published a special edition of its annual publication, COMSOL News, celebrating simulation specialists working in the field of acoustics.

Acoustics engineers shape experiences that create lifelong memories, whether it’s the hearing aid that allows a loved one to rejoin the dinner conversation, or those moments when you’re singing the words of your favorite song in the car. This special edition of COMSOL News 2017 highlights novel design solutions, from virtual product development to NVH performance, acoustic cloaking, and feedback reduction, impacting day-to-day life.

“Since acoustics phenomena are inherently multiphysics, engineers use the most powerful modeling tools to account for several types of physics and their coupling” says Mads Jensen, Technical Product Manager, Acoustics. “These success stories inspire by showing us the work that went into the design of innovative products that must perform under competing priorities for many different customers.”

COMSOL News 2017 Special Edition Acoustics is available as an online magazine and can be viewed digitally or downloaded in PDF format at: www.comsol.com/offers/comsol-news-2017-special-edition-acoustics.

The Conversation (0)

Why Functional Programming Should Be the Future of Software Development

It’s hard to learn, but your code will produce fewer nasty surprises

11 min read
Vertical
A plate of spaghetti made from code
Shira Inbar
DarkBlue1

You’d expectthe longest and most costly phase in the lifecycle of a software product to be the initial development of the system, when all those great features are first imagined and then created. In fact, the hardest part comes later, during the maintenance phase. That’s when programmers pay the price for the shortcuts they took during development.

So why did they take shortcuts? Maybe they didn’t realize that they were cutting any corners. Only when their code was deployed and exercised by a lot of users did its hidden flaws come to light. And maybe the developers were rushed. Time-to-market pressures would almost guarantee that their software will contain more bugs than it would otherwise.

Keep Reading ↓Show less
{"imageShortcodeIds":["31996907"]}