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Beyond Second Life: Philip Rosedale’s Gutsy Plan for a New Virtual-Reality Empire

High Fidelity’s decentralized architecture aims to power the next generation of virtual-reality worlds

12 min read
Virtual-reality pioneer Philip Rosedale in photo-illustration
Photo-Illustration by Sinelab; Original photo: Gabriela Hasbun

Virtual-reality pioneer Philip Rosedale in photo-illustration Photo-Illustration: Sinelab; Original photo: Gabriela Hasbun

Philip Rosedale, the Willy Wonka of virtual reality, is giving me a tour of his bustling office in San Francisco in August when his blue eyes sparkle with a better idea. “Let’s just go in-world instead,” he suggests. I follow him to a windowless back room. Waiting there for us are a large HDTV screen, a computer, a few cardboard boxes, and two small, black infrared light-emitting beacons that point down from the high corners.

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For Quantum Computing, Is 99 Percent Accuracy Enough?

Australian, Japanese, and Dutch researchers trim qubit error rates—and cross the “threshold for error correction”

3 min read
Geometric illustration of two small red circles, to the left and right, surrounded by a yellow and white clover-leaf pattern

This visualization of a University of New South Wales team’s entangled three-qubit system depicts quantum logic operations that can be realized with greater than 99 percent accuracy.

University of New South Wales
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Cutting Carbon Emissions Is Harder Than the Glasgow Climate Pact Thinks

The COP26 demands that we reduce global emissions by two-fifths in just nine years

2 min read
Photo of a man in a jacket, wearing glasses and a sign that says “President” in front of him.
Christoph Soeder/picture alliance/Getty Images

Three months ago the Glasgow Climate Pact (COP26) declared that by 2030 the world must cut total carbon dioxide emissions by 50 percent relative to the 2010 level, which was 30.4 billion tonnes. This would bring annual emissions to less than 20 billion tonnes, a level last seen more than 30 years ago.

What are the chances of that? Let’s look at the arithmetic.

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National Instruments Paves the Way for Terahertz Regime in 6G Networks

Developing tools that can test new technologies for 6G networks is the key step in making it a reality

3 min read

This is a sponsored article brought to you by National Instruments (NI).

While 5G networks continue their rollout around the world, researchers and engineers are already looking ahead to a new generation of mobile networks, dubbed 6G. One of the key elements for 6G networks will be to move beyond the millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum and up into the terahertz (THz) spectrum. The THz spectrum will certainly open up more bandwidth, but there are a number of technical challenges that will need to be addressed if mobile networks can ever exploit this spectrum.

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