Artificial Retina Impresses, But Is It Nanotechnology?

Nanoelectrodes seem to form the basis of artificial retina technology; we just don't know much about them

1 min read
Artificial Retina Impresses, But Is It Nanotechnology?

The Wall Street Journal’s online magazine Market Watchrecently ran a story on two new approaches to overcoming degenerative eye diseases with artificial retinas.

The story came across my desk by virtue of the fact that one of the companies goes by the name Nano Retina. The Israel-based company is a joint venture between Rainbow Medical and Zyvex Labs, the latter being well known for its work in nanotechnology and its founder Jim Von Ehr, who has been a strong proponent of molecular mechanosynthesis.

Both Nano Retina’s and its competitor Second Sight’s approaches to providing a solution to disease-caused blindness impressed me. And the Wall Street Journal article expressed intrigue that "the number of blind persons in the U.S. is projected to increase by 70 percent, to 1.6 million by 2020, with a similar rise projected for low vision," according to a 2004 paper prepared by a research group led by a Johns Hopkins University professor, Nathan Congdon. In other words, it's a growth sector, which always pleases investors.

But I wanted to know where the nanotechnology was in the “Nano” Retina. Finding out turned out not to be an easy task. There was the video from the company Web site below, which explained that the implantable device contained “nanoelectrodes.”

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/v/aeD7e0QfD2c&rel=0&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3 expand=1]

The written information on the company did not shine any further light on the subject. The video does seem to claim some pretty amazing capabilities for these nanoelectrodes. Apparently, they “interface with the eye’s bipolar neurons” and restart neural stimulation, allowing for messages to go to the brain.

I have to confess I would like to know more, but I’m sure this is all highly proprietary information for a company that doesn’t expect to start clinical trials until 2013.

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3D-Stacked CMOS Takes Moore’s Law to New Heights

When transistors can’t get any smaller, the only direction is up

10 min read
An image of stacked squares with yellow flat bars through them.
Emily Cooper
Green

Perhaps the most far-reaching technological achievement over the last 50 years has been the steady march toward ever smaller transistors, fitting them more tightly together, and reducing their power consumption. And yet, ever since the two of us started our careers at Intel more than 20 years ago, we’ve been hearing the alarms that the descent into the infinitesimal was about to end. Yet year after year, brilliant new innovations continue to propel the semiconductor industry further.

Along this journey, we engineers had to change the transistor’s architecture as we continued to scale down area and power consumption while boosting performance. The “planar” transistor designs that took us through the last half of the 20th century gave way to 3D fin-shaped devices by the first half of the 2010s. Now, these too have an end date in sight, with a new gate-all-around (GAA) structure rolling into production soon. But we have to look even further ahead because our ability to scale down even this new transistor architecture, which we call RibbonFET, has its limits.

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