A Touch of Money

Biometric authentication systems for credit cards could put identity thieves out of business

13 min read
Image: John Weber
Image: John Weber

He stole the identities of the world’s rich and famous—Paul Allen, Oprah Winfrey, Steven Spielberg, Warren Buffett, and Larry Ellison, to name a few. Until the New York City police busted 32-year-old Abraham Abdallah, it seemed that a diabolically gifted hacker, not a busboy at a Brooklyn restaurant, had masterminded this multimillion-dollar caper.

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Converting Coal Power Plants to Nuclear Gains Steam

A U.S. Department of Energy report identifies over 300 coal plants that could be swapped over

3 min read
illustration of a building concept

A rendering of TerraPower's Wyoming Project — plans to retrofit an existing coal plant with a sodium fast reactor.

TerraPower

On a planet aspiring to become carbon-neutral, the once-stalwart coal power plant is an emerging anachronism.

It is true that, in much of the developing world, coal-fired capacity continues to grow. But in every corner of the globe, political and financial pressures are mounting to bury coal back in the past. In the United States, coal’s share of electricity generation has plummeted since its early 2000s peak; 28 percent of U.S. coal plants are planned to shutter by 2035.

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Strange Topological Physics Could Help Enable 6G Tech

Topological chips can enable on-chip data rates of 160 gigabits per second

3 min read
A pattern of red triangles with some that are yellow

A new silicon device can help control terahertz communications on chips.

Nanyang Technological University/Nature Communications

The next generation of wireless communications, 6G, will likely rely on terahertz rays to help reach unprecedented speeds. Now research suggests that unusual topological physics may help control terahertz radiation on chips for 6G applications.

Terahertz waves (also called submillimeter radiation or far-infrared light) fall between optical waves and microwaves on the electromagnetic spectrum. Ranging in frequency from 0.1 to 10 terahertz, terahertz waves could be key to future 6G wireless networks.

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WIPL-D

Handling various complex simulation scenarios with a single simulation method is a rather challenging task for any software suite. We will show you how our software, based on Method-of-Moments, can analyze several scenarios including complicated and electrically large models (for instance, antenna placement and RCS) using desktop workstations.

Download this free whitepaper now!