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What Programming Language Skills Do Employers Want?

Java tops Indeed's latest list; Python, JavaScript rank high

1 min read
A man looking at Java code.
Photo: iStockphoto

What programming language skills do employers want? Online job-search firm Indeed took a look at three months (18 May to 18 August) of 2018 job listings in its tech software category to find out. The company ranked programming languages according to the percentage of job postings within the category that included mention of the language.

Java came out on top, both in Silicon Valley (35 percent of job postings listed the skill) and across the United States (30 percent).

When it came to number two, however, Silicon Valley job postings showed a sharp regional difference. In Silicon Valley, Python ranked second (28 percent); nationally, that spot went to JavaScript (26 percent), with Python in fourth place (17 percent).

Earlier this year, IEEE Spectrum released our weighted ranking of programming languages based on a variety of sources, including job search sites, Google search results, and Twitter. In this ranking, Python came out on top, with C++ in second and Java in third place.

Indeed’s full top ten, Silicon Valley and nationally, are listed below. (The Silicon Valley category included the broader Bay Area, encompassing the San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward and San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara metro areas.)

Most In-Demand Programming Languages in Silicon Valley

Language

Percent share of postings in “tech software” job category

Java

35

Python

28

JavaScript

22

C++

18

HTML

13

Ruby

8

Perl

6

C#

5

Xml

5

PHP

3

Most In-Demand Programming Languages in United States

Language

Percent share of postings in “tech software” job category

Java

30

JavaScript

26

HTML

18

Python

17

C#

15

C++

12

Xml

9

Ruby

6

PHP

5

Perl

4

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Why Functional Programming Should Be the Future of Software Development

It’s hard to learn, but your code will produce fewer nasty surprises

11 min read
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A plate of spaghetti made from code
Shira Inbar
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You’d expectthe longest and most costly phase in the lifecycle of a software product to be the initial development of the system, when all those great features are first imagined and then created. In fact, the hardest part comes later, during the maintenance phase. That’s when programmers pay the price for the shortcuts they took during development.

So why did they take shortcuts? Maybe they didn’t realize that they were cutting any corners. Only when their code was deployed and exercised by a lot of users did its hidden flaws come to light. And maybe the developers were rushed. Time-to-market pressures would almost guarantee that their software will contain more bugs than it would otherwise.

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