The October 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

Close bar

What Is a Robot? Rodney Brooks Offers an Answer—in Sonnet Form

We asked famed roboticist Rodney Brooks to explain his definition of robot. He sent us a sonnet

1 min read
MIT humanoid robot Cog holding up a black and white portrait of Rodney Brooks
In this 1995 photo, the humanoid robot Cog, built by a group of MIT researchers led by Rodney Brooks, is shown with a black-and-white portrait of its creator.
Photo: John B. Carnett/Bonnier Corp./Getty Images

Editor's Note: When we asked Rodney Brooks if he'd write an article for IEEE Spectrum on his definition of robot, he wrote back right away. “I recently learned that Warren McCulloch"—one of the pioneers of computational neuroscience—“wrote sonnets," Brooks told us. “He, and your request, inspired me. Here is my article—a little shorter than you might have desired." Included in his reply were 14 lines composed in iambic pentameter. Brooks titled it “What Is a Robot?" Later, after a few tweaks to improve the metric structure of some of the lines, he added, “I am no William Shakespeare, but I think it is now a real sonnet, if a little clunky in places."

What Is a Robot?*
By Rodney Brooks

Shall I compare thee to creatures of God?
Thou art more simple and yet more remote.
You move about, but still today, a clod,
You sense and act but don't see or emote.

You make fast maps with laser light all spread,
Then compare shapes to object libraries,
And quickly plan a path, to move ahead,
Then roll and touch and grasp so clumsily.

You learn just the tiniest little bit,
And start to show some low intelligence,
But we, your makers, Gods not, we admit,
All pledge to quest for genuine sentience.

So long as mortals breathe, or eyes can see,
We shall endeavor to give life to thee.

* With thanks to William Shakespeare

The Conversation (0)

The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
Horizontal
A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
DarkGray

In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

Keep Reading ↓Show less