Close

Singapore Researchers Unveil Social Robot Olivia

This chatty machine is designed to make friends

2 min read
Singapore Researchers Unveil Social Robot Olivia

Olivia, a social robot from Singapore, loves to talk -- and gesticulate with its sleek 6-degrees-of-freedom white plastic arms.

Designed as a research platform for human-robot interaction, Olivia is a creation of the A*STAR Social Robotics Laboratory, or ASORO, part of Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology, and Research.

The researchers plan to use the robot, unveiled at RoboCup 2010 in June, as a receptionist to greet visitors and provide information, and later, as a personal assistant and companion in people's homes.

Olivia's head has a pair of stereoscopic camera eyes and it can rotate and also tilt up or down. It appears to float over a ring of light, a design that reminds me of EVE, the little flying bot from WALL-E.

A third camera, on the robot's forehead, can zoom in on the speaker's face. Olivia uses software to detect lip movements and determine if a person is speaking to her. It uses eight microphones to locate the source of human speech and turn its face in the direction of the speaker.

So far Olivia can respond to specific keywords and phrases, such as "switch off the lights" or "introduce yourself." But the ASORO researchers, as other robotics groups, want the robot to respond to natural speech. They also plan to program Olivia to display sadness, happiness, and other behaviors to improve communication.

The robot, which is 1.6 meter tall and weighs in at 152 kilograms, is powered by an onboard Core i7 processor. The researchers plan to mount Olivia on a mobile base and upgrade it with new arms with three-finger hands so it can grasp objects.

IEEE Spectrum's Harry Goldstein met Olivia at RoboCup in Singapore and prepared the video below:

[youtube //www.youtube.com/v/BdC00QBs0go?fs=1&hl=en_US expand=1]

More images:

 

Images: IEEE Spectrum and ASORO

The Conversation (0)

How the U.S. Army Is Turning Robots Into Team Players

Engineers battle the limits of deep learning for battlefield bots

11 min read
Robot with threads near a fallen branch

RoMan, the Army Research Laboratory's robotic manipulator, considers the best way to grasp and move a tree branch at the Adelphi Laboratory Center, in Maryland.

Evan Ackerman
LightGreen

This article is part of our special report on AI, “The Great AI Reckoning.

"I should probably not be standing this close," I think to myself, as the robot slowly approaches a large tree branch on the floor in front of me. It's not the size of the branch that makes me nervous—it's that the robot is operating autonomously, and that while I know what it's supposed to do, I'm not entirely sure what it will do. If everything works the way the roboticists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, Md., expect, the robot will identify the branch, grasp it, and drag it out of the way. These folks know what they're doing, but I've spent enough time around robots that I take a small step backwards anyway.

The robot, named RoMan, for Robotic Manipulator, is about the size of a large lawn mower, with a tracked base that helps it handle most kinds of terrain. At the front, it has a squat torso equipped with cameras and depth sensors, as well as a pair of arms that were harvested from a prototype disaster-response robot originally developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a DARPA robotics competition. RoMan's job today is roadway clearing, a multistep task that ARL wants the robot to complete as autonomously as possible. Instead of instructing the robot to grasp specific objects in specific ways and move them to specific places, the operators tell RoMan to "go clear a path." It's then up to the robot to make all the decisions necessary to achieve that objective.

Keep Reading ↓ Show less