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Singapore Researchers Unveil Social Robot Olivia

This chatty machine is designed to make friends

2 min read
Singapore Researchers Unveil Social Robot Olivia

Olivia, a social robot from Singapore, loves to talk -- and gesticulate with its sleek 6-degrees-of-freedom white plastic arms.

Designed as a research platform for human-robot interaction, Olivia is a creation of the A*STAR Social Robotics Laboratory, or ASORO, part of Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology, and Research.

The researchers plan to use the robot, unveiled at RoboCup 2010 in June, as a receptionist to greet visitors and provide information, and later, as a personal assistant and companion in people's homes.

Olivia's head has a pair of stereoscopic camera eyes and it can rotate and also tilt up or down. It appears to float over a ring of light, a design that reminds me of EVE, the little flying bot from WALL-E.

A third camera, on the robot's forehead, can zoom in on the speaker's face. Olivia uses software to detect lip movements and determine if a person is speaking to her. It uses eight microphones to locate the source of human speech and turn its face in the direction of the speaker.

So far Olivia can respond to specific keywords and phrases, such as "switch off the lights" or "introduce yourself." But the ASORO researchers, as other robotics groups, want the robot to respond to natural speech. They also plan to program Olivia to display sadness, happiness, and other behaviors to improve communication.

The robot, which is 1.6 meter tall and weighs in at 152 kilograms, is powered by an onboard Core i7 processor. The researchers plan to mount Olivia on a mobile base and upgrade it with new arms with three-finger hands so it can grasp objects.

IEEE Spectrum's Harry Goldstein met Olivia at RoboCup in Singapore and prepared the video below:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/v/BdC00QBs0go?fs=1&hl=en_US expand=1]

More images:

 

Images: IEEE Spectrum and ASORO

The Conversation (0)

The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
DarkGray

In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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