IEEE Spectrum Wins Six Neal Awards

The publication was recognized for its editorial excellence, website, and art direction

1 min read
A group of smiling people holding two award placards in front of a backdrop for the Jess H. Neal Awards

The IEEE Spectrum editorial and art team show off two of their six awards.

Bruce Byers/SIIA

IEEE Spectrum garnered top honors at this year’s annual Jesse H. Neal Awards ceremony, held on 26 April. Known as the “Pulitzer Prizes” of business-to-business journalism, the Neal Awards recognize editorial excellence. The awards are given by the SIIA (Software and Information Industry Association).

For the fifth year in a row, IEEE Spectrum was awarded the Best Media Brand. The award is given for overall editorial excellence.


IEEE Spectrum also received these awards:

“The talented, dedicated team that produces the world’s best tech magazine day in and day out deserved to win Best Media Brand for the fifth year running,” says Harry Goldstein, IEEE Spectrum’s acting editor in chief. “We’re also delighted that Evan Ackerman’s astounding body of work on robotics earned an award, along with our Hands On column, written and curated by Stephen Cass and David Schneider, assisted by online art director Erik Vrielink.

“And speaking of art direction,” Goldstein says, “our other two Neals, for Best Cover and Best Single Article Treatment, came through the efforts of our staff including Brandon Palacio, Randi Klett, and Mark Montgomery.”

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