IEEE Day 2020 Events Will Be Virtual

Organizers suggest activities for the 6 October celebration

2 min read
Members of the Eskisehir Technical University IEEE Student Branch, in Turkey, celebrate IEEE day with an oversized T-shirt.
Members of the IEEE Eskisehir Technical University Student Branch, in Turkey, celebrate IEEE Day 2019 with an oversized T-shirt.
Photo: IEEE Eskisehir Technical University Student Branch

THE INSTITUTE For the first time in the 11-year history of IEEE Day, the events—scheduled for 6 October this year—are to be held virtually. Due to the COVID-19 global health crisis, the IEEE Day team has made structural changes.

IEEE Day commemorates the anniversary of the meeting in Philadelphia in 1884 when members of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, one of IEEE’s two predecessor societies, gathered for the first time to share technical ideas.

The event’s organizing team is excited to be able to engage members from around the world with the virtual events. Time, location, and travel are no longer obstacles to attending an event. What’s more, to accommodate those sections that prefer to hold weekend events, celebrations can be held throughout the first two weeks of October.

Not sure the type of virtual event to plan? The team is working on a list of ideas. Here are a few to consider:

  • Webinars: These could include IEEE-related technical talks, many of which are available on demand. Consider inviting experts from one of the IEEE societies’ Distinguished Lecturer programs, or subject-matter experts from industry. Ask members involved with humanitarian activities to talk about their project.
  • Interactive events: Consider online social gatherings, networking sessions, and virtual gaming.
  • Virtual gatherings: Use WebEx, IEEE Collabratec, Microsoft Teams, Zoom, or Facebook Live to watch technology videos together. Conduct virtual tours of plants and factories. Read interesting articles or discuss a book.
  • Videos: IEEE has several videos on IEEE.tv about its programs. They include a tour of the IEEE History Center’s most treasured artifacts, an overview of some humanitarian projects members are involved with, and tips on mastering STEM topics.

PLANNING TOOLS

To assist planners, organizers have created a helpful IEEE Day-in-a-Box event kit. Located under the Resources tab on the IEEE Day website, the kit walks you through the planning process.

In the Toolkit section of the website are posters, banners, and other promotional materials that can be downloaded. For those who want to distribute T-shirts to their attendees, there are downloadable templates with this year’s design.

It’s not too early to start planning. Check the IEEE Day website for updates, and follow us on social media.

Sakib Ahmed is the IEEE Day communications lead from the IEEE Bangladesh Section in Region10. Denise Maestri is the IEEE Day staff coordinator. She’s the member and volunteer-engagement manager for IEEE Member and Geographic Activities.

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