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How Much Does Cybercrime Cost? $113 Billion

The losses are staggering, and they’re growing at an alarming rate

2 min read
How Much Does Cybercrime Cost? $113 Billion

According to Internet security awareness training firm KnowBe4, the losses attributable to cybercrime total US $113 billion. Take a moment to let that astounding number sink in.

Now here's some more: The fourth annual Cost of Cyber Crime Study conducted by Ponemon Institute and sponsored by HP notes that costs for businesses that are victims of Internet-based attacks has risen 78 percent per year, on average, over the past four years. And from 2010 through this year, the time needed to recover from a breach has increased 130 percent. The losses in terms of personal information, intellectual property, and system damage are staggering enough. But now the average cost of cleaning up after a successful attack has passed the $1-million mark—not counting the cost of customer lawsuits against companies whose systems have been breached.  

Meanwhile, Symantec’s just-released 2013 Norton Report notes that although the overall number of victims of online attacks has actually decreased, the average cost per victim has risen by 50 percent. "Today's cybercriminals are using more sophisticated attacks, such as ransomware and spear-phishing, which yield them more money per attack than ever before," said Stephen Trilling, Symantec’s CTO in a press release.

In Other Cybercrime News…

Image: iStockphoto

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How the FCC Settles Radio-Spectrum Turf Wars

Remember the 5G-airport controversy? Here’s how such disputes play out

11 min read
This photo shows a man in the basket of a cherry picker working on an antenna as an airliner passes overhead.

The airline and cellular-phone industries have been at loggerheads over the possibility that 5G transmissions from antennas such as this one, located at Los Angeles International Airport, could interfere with the radar altimeters used in aircraft.

Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images
Blue

You’ve no doubt seen the scary headlines: Will 5G Cause Planes to Crash? They appeared late last year, after the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration warned that new 5G services from AT&T and Verizon might interfere with the radar altimeters that airplane pilots rely on to land safely. Not true, said AT&T and Verizon, with the backing of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, which had authorized 5G. The altimeters are safe, they maintained. Air travelers didn’t know what to believe.

Another recent FCC decision had also created a controversy about public safety: okaying Wi-Fi devices in a 6-gigahertz frequency band long used by point-to-point microwave systems to carry safety-critical data. The microwave operators predicted that the Wi-Fi devices would disrupt their systems; the Wi-Fi interests insisted they would not. (As an attorney, I represented a microwave-industry group in the ensuing legal dispute.)

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