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For The First Time, Electronics Printed On Paper Can Be Fully Recycled

Long-lasting devices written with carbon nanomaterial inks can be remade into new ones when their work is done

2 min read
still from a video showing the printing of recyclable electronic circuits on paper
Image: Duke University

With a cocktail of carbon-based inks, engineers have made the first fully printable and recyclable electronic circuits on paper. The sturdy, high-performance devices last for months, and can be decomposed at the end to recover the carbon materials so they can be reused for printing.

The recyclable carbon electronics are not meant to supplant silicon, says Aaron Franklin, an electrical and computer engineering professor at Duke University who reported the advance in Nature Electronics. Instead, this is a way to satisfy the thirst for ubiquitous, embedded electronics without sending enormous amounts of often toxic waste to landfills and the environment.

“It is absolutely not targeted at upending the half-trillion dollar semiconductor industry,” he says. “People want more and more data, and more sensors to capture that data. Be it agricultural or medical or environmental sensors, there’s an increasing appetite for getting electronics all over the place.”

Research on printed and transient electronics has exploded in recent years to meet this demand for low-cost, eco-friendly sensors. Transient electronics are designed to degrade and disappear after use instead of lingering in the body or the environment. But they still create silicon and other waste. Meanwhile, past efforts to print circuits still utilize some techniques outside of the printer, Franklin says. “We emphasize print-in-place. We put the substrate on printer, print everything and then pull it out, and the device is ready to test. And the performance is on par if not better than most other printed transistors.”

To get these high-quality devices, the researchers used carbon inks for all three main elements of thin-film transistors: semiconductor, conductor and insulator. The semiconducting and conductive inks were made from off-the-shelf carbon nanotubes and graphene.

The crucial advance is the researchers’ new insulator ink. For this, they used nanocellulose, an abundant, biodegradable material made from wood pulp. It is used commonly in food packaging, cosmetics and wood products, and sheets of it are also used in electronics as an insulator. But Franklin and his colleagues are the first to suspend nanocellulose in a solution and use it as an ink in printing circuits.

gif of printingGif: Duke University

With a machine that Franklin describes as an advanced version of a common inkjet printer, the team deposited the three inks onto paper one layer at a time to make transistors. The machine vaporizes the ink into a fine mist of microscopic droplets and guides this aerosol onto the paper surface using an inert gas. But the underlying technique could be transferred to faster roll-to-roll printing, which could churn out thousands of devices quickly.

The devices made had an “astonishingly long shelf life,” he says. “It was genuinely surprising to us.” The bare transistors, without any protective coating or encapsulation, have been sitting on a lab shelf for nine months without any loss in performance, he says.

Recycling the devices involves immersing them in a series of baths, and using sound waves to vibrate them so as to separate all the components. The carbon nanotubes and graphene can be filtered out, and nearly all of it can be recovered to be reused for printing. The nanocellulose and the paper substrate can then be recycled separately.

Franklin says his team haves several applications in mind for the printed carbon electronics that they are now testing. “It’s incredibly promising what these devices can do.”

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Two Startups Are Bringing Fiber to the Processor

Avicena’s blue microLEDs are the dark horse in a race with Ayar Labs’ laser-based system

5 min read
Diffuse blue light shines from a patterned surface through a ring. A blue cable leads away from it.

Avicena’s microLED chiplets could one day link all the CPUs in a computer cluster together.

Avicena

If a CPU in Seoul sends a byte of data to a processor in Prague, the information covers most of the distance as light, zipping along with no resistance. But put both those processors on the same motherboard, and they’ll need to communicate over energy-sapping copper, which slow the communication speeds possible within computers. Two Silicon Valley startups, Avicena and Ayar Labs, are doing something about that longstanding limit. If they succeed in their attempts to finally bring optical fiber all the way to the processor, it might not just accelerate computing—it might also remake it.

Both companies are developing fiber-connected chiplets, small chips meant to share a high-bandwidth connection with CPUs and other data-hungry silicon in a shared package. They are each ramping up production in 2023, though it may be a couple of years before we see a computer on the market with either product.

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