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Desertec Taps Morocco For First Piece of Sahara Solar Development

500-Megawatt project portends the massive buildout aimed at generating 15% of Europe's power by 2050

2 min read
Desertec Taps Morocco For First Piece of Sahara Solar Development

We've covered Desertec's Sahara solar ambitions in this space before, so it is with some excitement that we note the announcement of the group's first major project, a 500-megawatt solar thermal plant to be built beginning next year in Morocco.

The specific site is yet to be announced, but the solar plant is meant to be just the first in a series of massive installations around North Africa and the Middle East. As the Guardian reported, the Desertec Industrial Initiative's chief executive Paul van Son called the Moroccan solar plant a "reference project," allowing investors and observers to see that the concept can work. There are still, of course, a number of questions surrounding an overall vision involving 470,000 MW of power, but the fact that Desertec seems poised to move from the abstract to the concrete is a welcome development.

And others are starting to notice the massive energy resource hitting the deserts of North Africa every day as well. Earlier this summer Nur Energie announced an agreement with Italian transmission network operator Terna that will send a high-voltage undersea cable across the Mediterranean from Tunisia. This sets the table for development of solar plants in the Tunisian desert; the agreement will allow up to 2,000 MW to be connected into the Italian grid. Elsewhere, Spectrum's Eliza Strickland reported last month on a Japanese-backed initiative called the Sahara Solar Breeder Project, where sand becomes silicon becomes solar panels and sends energy around the region and to Europe.

Of course, the Arab Spring upheaval in the region has called many energy-related issues into question, from oil access to renewables. But there are signs in some places that the result will be positive; Tunisia's transitional government said they will spend $2 billion renewable development, and according to some experts it seems that the progress toward reform across the region will at worst not stop renewable energy's progress, and at best will speed it along.

(Image of Moroccan desert via Joao Almeida)

The Conversation (0)
This photograph shows a car with the words “We Drive Solar” on the door, connected to a charging station. A windmill can be seen in the background.

The Dutch city of Utrecht is embracing vehicle-to-grid technology, an example of which is shown here—an EV connected to a bidirectional charger. The historic Rijn en Zon windmill provides a fitting background for this scene.

We Drive Solar

Hundreds of charging stations for electric vehicles dot Utrecht’s urban landscape in the Netherlands like little electric mushrooms. Unlike those you may have grown accustomed to seeing, many of these stations don’t just charge electric cars—they can also send power from vehicle batteries to the local utility grid for use by homes and businesses.

Debates over the feasibility and value of such vehicle-to-grid technology go back decades. Those arguments are not yet settled. But big automakers like Volkswagen, Nissan, and Hyundai have moved to produce the kinds of cars that can use such bidirectional chargers—alongside similar vehicle-to-home technology, whereby your car can power your house, say, during a blackout, as promoted by Ford with its new F-150 Lightning. Given the rapid uptake of electric vehicles, many people are thinking hard about how to make the best use of all that rolling battery power.

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