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CES 2011: In The Chips

New chips take the spotlight at the 2011 CES

1 min read
CES 2011: In The Chips

Two days does not a trend make…or does it? The consumer electronics show in Las Vegas has always been about what the products do—show big pictures, communicate blazingly fast. Secondarily, CES typically has a couple of standards subtexts, for the industry learned in the bloody Betamax/VHS battle over videotape, it ignores standards at its peril. But little attention has typically been paid to the chips inside of all these shiny new devices—even the flashy Intel Inside campaign a number of years ago didn’t change that.

But this year, the chips are taking a bow. Yesterday, it was Intel’s Sandy Bridge processors that had their moment in the spotlight.

Today, JVC at its press conference referred repeatedly to its new Falconbrid (that’s not a typo for bird) microprocessor that will soon power a new generation of products, including displays with 4K by 2K resolution and high-speed cameras. The processor will also be the heart of the company’s new high definition 3D camcorder that ships in March.

Over at Samsung, booth representatives were well-trained in describing the way that company's BSI CMOS sensor were making its camera's better than ever.

Will a nod to the processor become as common to consumer electronics product introductions as thanks to mom are at Academy Award acceptances? Stay tuned.

For more gadget news, check out our complete coverage of the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show.

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The Transistor at 75

The past, present, and future of the modern world’s most important invention

1 min read
A photo of a birthday cake with 75 written on it.
Lisa Sheehan
LightGreen

Seventy-five years is a long time. It’s so long that most of us don’t remember a time before the transistor, and long enough for many engineers to have devoted entire careers to its use and development. In honor of this most important of technological achievements, this issue’s package of articles explores the transistor’s historical journey and potential future.

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