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5G New Radio InterOperability Device Testing for 28 GHz

InterOperability Device Testing (IODT) determines whether the base station and device can establish and maintain a robust communication link that can carry out 5G performance in prescribed test conditions.

1 min read
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NI recently announced plans to collaborate with Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. to develop 5G test user equipment (UE) for 5G New Radio (NR). The first public demonstration of this collaboration is at Mobile World Congress 2018 in Barcelona.

The formation of a new 5G ecosystem calls for equipment and device manufacturers to test their implementations that conform to this standard with each other to achieve the goal of interoperability. InterOperability Device Testing (IODT) determines whether the base station and device can establish and maintain a robust communication link that can carry out 5G performance in prescribed test conditions.

To that end, NI and Samsung have agreed to collaborate on IODT in which Samsung’s 5G NR-capable commercial base station connects with test UE developed by NI at 28 GHz over the air and in real time. The test UE uses our 28 GHz mmWave Transceiver System with a compliant 5G NR Phase 1 protocol stack developed using LabVIEW system design software. It exchanges messages with the base station to establish a link, and then validates the downlink functionality and performance as dictated by the 3GPP.

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The company looks forward to continuing to work with Samsung to validate 5G systems, test emerging 5G equipment and speed adoption and commercialization.

See how NI is driving next-generation wireless communications.

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Why the Internet Needs the InterPlanetary File System

Peer-to-peer file sharing would make the Internet far more efficient

12 min read
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Carl De Torres
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When the COVID-19 pandemic erupted in early 2020, the world made an unprecedented shift to remote work. As a precaution, some Internet providers scaled back service levels temporarily, although that probably wasn’t necessary for countries in Asia, Europe, and North America, which were generally able to cope with the surge in demand caused by people teleworking (and binge-watching Netflix). That’s because most of their networks were overprovisioned, with more capacity than they usually need. But in countries without the same level of investment in network infrastructure, the picture was less rosy: Internet service providers (ISPs) in South Africa and Venezuela, for instance, reported significant strain.

But is overprovisioning the only way to ensure resilience? We don’t think so. To understand the alternative approach we’re championing, though, you first need to recall how the Internet works.

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