Tag Results for technoculture (21)

  1. East Meets West in Corporate Culture?

    By Suhas Sreedhar Outsourcing jobs to third-world companies has been a fairly polarizing issue in the past, and those ardently in favor of it and against it will probably continue to debate its merits for many years to come. But for all practical purposes the issue is passé. Outsourcing has happened, is happening, and will continue to happen. A more interesting question is, what impact can it have on corporate culture? At Paprikaas Interactive, an animation studio based in Bangalore, India, I found an interesting answer. Outsourcing has the potential to help to combine the best of eastern and western business practices, …

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  2. IEEE 125th Anniversary: How It All Got Started (Part 2)

    As mentioned yesterday, the IEEE is celebrating its 125th anniversary. The modern institute is a descendant of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, founded in 1884. So let's take a look at how it all began. The idea for such an enterprise was proposed in the spring of 1884 by N. S. Keith, of Philadelphia, an inventor and electrometallurgical engineer. Aware of the impending International Electrical Exhibition in Philadelphia in the fall, Keith reasoned that professionals working in the electrical field should organize in time to officially welcome visitors from other nations on behalf of the United …

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  3. IEEE 125th Anniversary: How It All Got Started (Part 1)

    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) turned 125 today. Technically speaking, the IEEE arose from a merger of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE) and the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE) in 1963. Still, the older and bigger parent, the AIEE, held its first meeting on 13 May 1884 in New York City to become a professional society for electrical engineers, which were quickly growing in numbers in the wake of remarkable breakthroughs in technology in the late Nineteenth Century. To commemorate the occasion, the IEEE is carrying out a series of activities to promote the profession …

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  4. Sun/Oracle Deal: The Hardware Implications

    The blockbuster US $7.4 billion deal bringing Sun Microsystems into Oracle Corp.'s big tent (please see Bolt from the Blue: Oracle, Not IBM, Captures Sun Micro) has more than a few wondering what the world's largest business software company will do with a firm best known for its hardware offerings. After the merger was announced Monday, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison said the acquisition of Sun would enable his company to offer customers applications and data-storage hardware in a bundle that will be tuned to help solve their business computing needs. Yet, some industry analysts speculated that by …

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  5. Model Robot Takes to the Catwalk in Japan

    The fashion world has a new face to envy. At five-foot-two, she may not measure up to her competition on the runway, but then she works for free and never complains about her diet, because she doesn't have one. She's a robot. Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) demonstrated the new humanoid recently at a show during Tokyo's Fashion Week. The HRP-4C robot strutted her stuff alongside the world's most famous models, wearing a skintight silver and black outfit designed by her creators (which she actually wears all the time) that carries a price tag of …

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  6. It's Square Root Day (All Over Again)

    It's 3 March 2009 (or 3/3/09), so that means that it's Square Root Day! As pointed out in numerous media outlets, today is a big deal for math lovers everywhere. Why else would a prestigious publication like Scientific American cover it in a blog entry? As SciAm's John Matson points out, the "unofficial holiday comes around but nine times a century, when the numbers of the calendar align so that the month and day are each equal to the square …

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  7. Time Magazine Picks the Top 50 Inventions of the Year

    The editors at Time have gazed at the world of high-tech and picked the cream of the crop to appear this year. In its annual Best Inventions List, the news magazine has selected 50 innovations that hold the promise of improving our lives. But enough talk. You just want to see the results. So without further ado, here are the winners. Coming in at Number 1 (drum roll) is The Retail DNA Test. A start-up called 23andMe, in Mountain View, Calif., funded by Google, has created a US $399 DNA analysis kit that supposedly …

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  8. Nuclear Physics Hip-hop Video Climbs the Charts

    A few weeks back, associate editor Sally Adee spotted a music video on YouTube that struck her fancy, plus it actually offered some real scientific background on the controversial Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest subatomic particle accelerator. So she posted it to our blog (please see Large Nerd Collider). (The controversy over the LHC comes from skeptics who claim the operation of the accelerator could result in producing artificial black holes that could eventually swallow the whole planet: see Courts Weigh Doomsday Claims at MSNBC.) For a publication such …

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  9. Leah Jamieson Talks About Reinventing the Engneer

    Leah Jamieson, past IEEE president and Dean of Engineering at Purdue University, addressed the plenary session at Fortune's Brainstorm Tech meeting in Half Moon Bay, California on Wednesday. Her call to action was three-fold---attract, educate, manage---and included: The challenge for all of us: Changing the perception of engineering and other technology professions. Making sure that young people understand how engineers can make the world a better place. The challenge for educators: Changing the way engineering and other technology disciplines are taught. Moving away from the discipline by discipline approach and toward integrated experiences …

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