Tag Results for inventors (21)

  1. Time Magazine Picks the Top 50 Inventions of the Year

    The editors at Time have gazed at the world of high-tech and picked the cream of the crop to appear this year. In its annual Best Inventions List, the news magazine has selected 50 innovations that hold the promise of improving our lives. But enough talk. You just want to see the results. So without further ado, here are the winners. Coming in at Number 1 (drum roll) is The Retail DNA Test. A start-up called 23andMe, in Mountain View, Calif., funded by Google, has created a US $399 DNA analysis kit that supposedly …

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  2. Morgan Sparks, Creator of Practical Transistor (1916-2008)

    The man who turned the earliest transistor into a practical device, launching a revolution in electronics, has passed away at the age of 91 in Fullerton, Calif. Morgan Sparks was a researcher at AT&T Bell Labs when he was recruited by John Bardeen, Walter Brattain, and William Shockley to help exploit a breakthrough circuit they were calling the point-contact transistor. Working with fellow AT&T engineers Gordon Teal and John Little, Sparks took the invention and fashioned a low-power variation on it that the laboratory dubbed the bipolar junction transistor, which improved …

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  3. Samsung Buys Pioneering Display Technology Firm

    About a year and a half ago, we published a feature on the latest advances in flat-panel displays -- please see "Displays of a Different Stripe". It was penned by Joel Pollack, the president and chief executive officer of Clairvoyante Inc., a display-architecture firm in Cupertino, Calif. In it, Pollack discussed in detail how today's new display technologies work in relation to human visual perception. Now, we've received word that his company's patents have been purchased by Samsung Electronics, the world's leading maker of high-definition televisions. In today's announcement, Samsung said that it had …

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  4. Aeronautics Innovator Paul MacCready (1925-2007)

    The brilliant inventor who gave the world such remarkable achievements as the first human-powered aircraft has passed away. Paul MacCready, an innovator of all manner of aerodynamic vehicles died last week of an undisclosed ailment at the age of 81. He was a man ahead of his time. MacCready first expressed his passion for flying machines at the age of 15, when he won a U.S. competition to build the best flying model of an airplane. It would be far from his last victory in major invention contests. According to an account by the …

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  5. Commute to Work in Your Volantor

    A U.S. aeronautics company has designed a line of vehicles that will let you fly to the office parking lot in the future. In a scenario right out of "The Jetsons," the people at Moller International, of Davis, Calif., think the notion of commuting using one of their volantors, or vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, is not so far-fetched, even though previous incarnations of flying cars have been spectacular flops as far back as anyone can remember. In a BBC news item today, the inventor of the flying-saucer-style vehicle, aeronautics engineer Paul Moller, foresees highways in …

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  6. Countdown Ticking for Spectrum/Make DIY Contest

    If you're a do-it-yourself type, the clock is running on submitting your latest electronics innovation to the IEEE Spectrum/Make DIY Contest. The magazines have extended the entry deadline to 9 September at midnight (ET). So now is the time to finalize your submission and get it into the hands of the judges. If your invention wins, you'll get prominent recognition at one of the world's premiere DIY events, the annual Maker Faire, as well as exposure in the magazines, which reach a readership of more than a million people who share your interests. …

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  7. Fairchild Semi to Celebrate the Big Five-Oh

    The people at Fairchild Semiconductor are tooting their horn these days over the upcoming celebration of their 50th birthday. Obviously, it's a big deal for them, but why should you care? Because the computer or device you're using to read these words depends in large part on the fundamental breakthroughs that the founders of Fairchild made a half century ago. Moreover, the creation of this semiconductor company stands as a dramatic lesson in how progress advances in fits and starts, inspired by individuals when they have the right conditions in which to work their magic. The story of Fairchild Semi …

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