Winner: Quantum Leap

Quantum-dot lasers from Japan’s QD Laser will make high-speed “fiber to the home” networks simpler, cheaper, and more power-efficient

9 min read
Japanese start-up QD Laser’s Yasuhiko Arakawa and Mitsuru Sugawara
Photo: Bruce Osborn; Photo-illustration: Bryan Christie Design

This is part of IEEE Spectrum’s SPECIAL REPORT: WINNERS & LOSERS 2009, The Year’s Best and Worst of Technology.

Japanese start-up QD Laser\u2019s Yasuhiko Arakawa and Mitsuru SugawaraQuantum Dot-Com: Japanese start-up QD Laser’s Yasuhiko Arakawa (left) and Mitsuru Sugawara oversaw the 15-year effort to commercialize a temperature-stable semiconductor laser.Photo: Bruce Osborn; Photo-illustration: Bryan Christie Design

Keep reading...Show less

This article is for IEEE members only. Join IEEE to access our full archive.

Join the world’s largest professional organization devoted to engineering and applied sciences and get access to all of Spectrum’s articles, podcasts, and special reports. Learn more →

If you're already an IEEE member, please sign in to continue reading.

Membership includes:

  • Get unlimited access to IEEE Spectrum content
  • Follow your favorite topics to create a personalized feed of IEEE Spectrum content
  • Save Spectrum articles to read later
  • Network with other technology professionals
  • Establish a professional profile
  • Create a group to share and collaborate on projects
  • Discover IEEE events and activities
  • Join and participate in discussions

Sleep Can Keep AI From Catastrophic Forgetting

New data-replay strategy prevents AI amnesia

3 min read
silhouette of head laying down with abstract colorful towers inside
iStock

Neural networks can achieve superhuman performance in many tasks, but these AI systems can suddenly and completely forget what they have learned if asked to absorb new memories. Now a new study reveals a novel way for neural networks to undergo sleep-like phases and help prevent such amnesia.

A major challenge that artificial neural networks face is "catastrophic forgetting." When they learn a new task, they have an unfortunate tendency to abruptly and entirely forget what they previously learned. Essentially, they overwrite past data with new knowledge.

Keep Reading ↓Show less

Robot Gift Guide 2022

Your yearly selection of awesome robot gifts

7 min read
A collage of 9 photos of robots, including quadrupeds robots, wheeled robots, and drones.
IEEE Spectrum (Robots: Companies)

It’s been a couple of years, but the IEEE Spectrum Robot Gift Guide is back for 2022! We’ve got all kinds of new robots, and right now is an excellent time to buy one (or a dozen), since many of them are on sale this week. We’ve tried to focus on consumer robots that are actually available (or that you can at least order), but depending on when you’re reading this guide, the prices we have here may not be up to date, and we’re not taking shipping into account.

And if these robots aren’t enough for you, many of our picks from years past are still available: check out our guides from 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, and 2012. And as always, if you have suggestions that you’d like to share, post a comment to help the rest of us find the perfect robot gift.

Keep Reading ↓Show less

Learn How Global Configuration Management and IBM CLM Work Together

In this presentation we will build the case for component-based requirements management

2 min read

This is a sponsored article brought to you by 321 Gang.

To fully support Requirements Management (RM) best practices, a tool needs to support traceability, versioning, reuse, and Product Line Engineering (PLE). This is especially true when designing large complex systems or systems that follow standards and regulations. Most modern requirement tools do a decent job of capturing requirements and related metadata. Some tools also support rudimentary mechanisms for baselining and traceability capabilities (“linking” requirements). The earlier versions of IBM DOORS Next supported a rich configurable traceability and even a rudimentary form of reuse. DOORS Next became a complete solution for managing requirements a few years ago when IBM invented and implemented Global Configuration Management (GCM) as part of its Engineering Lifecycle Management (ELM, formerly known as Collaborative Lifecycle Management or simply CLM) suite of integrated tools. On the surface, it seems that GCM just provides versioning capability, but it is so much more than that. GCM arms product/system development organizations with support for advanced requirement reuse, traceability that supports versioning, release management and variant management. It is also possible to manage collections of related Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) and Systems Engineering artifacts in a single configuration.

Keep Reading ↓Show less