Which Tech Leaders Do Tech Professionals Admire? Elon Musk Heads the List

And women come on strong in Hired’s top ten most inspiring tech leaders

1 min read
Illustration of Elon Musk
Illustration: Shutterstock

In a recent survey of 3,600 tech professionals—including software developers, data scientists, and project managers—job search firm Hired asked respondents to select a “most inspiring” leader in tech.

Elon Musk, chief executive officer of Tesla and SpaceX and founder of the Boring Company and Neuralink, came out on top. And while Musk has made missteps, there’s no doubt that his big ambitions for tech’s future serve to inspire.

Headshot of Ann Wojcicki Ann Wojcicki, CEO of 23andMe Photo: 23andMe

Jeff Bezos, the Amazon CEO with a reputation as a harsh boss, took the number two spot; Microsoft’s Satya Nadella came in third place; and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg placed fourth. Jack Ma, who just stepped down as chairman of Alibaba, was the only non-U.S. leader to make the top ten.

Four women ranked among the most inspiring leaders in Hired’s rankings: Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg, former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer (who recently founded AI start-up incubator Lumi Labs), and sisters Susan Wojcicki (CEO of YouTube) and Ann Wojcicki (founder and CEO of 23andMe).

Most Inspiring Tech Leaders

Rank Tech Leader Company
1 Elon Musk Tesla, SpaceX, The Boring Company, Neuralink
2 Jeff Bezos Amazon
3 Satya Nadella Microsoft
4 Mark Zuckerberg Facebook
5 Jack Ma Alibaba
6 Sheryl Sandberg Facebook
7 Reed Hastings Netflix
8 Susan Wojcicki YouTube
9 Marissa Mayer Lumi Labs; former Yahoo
10 Anne Wojcicki 23andMe

Source: Hired

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Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

His pivot from defense helped a tiny tuning-fork prevent SUV rollovers and plane crashes

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Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

In 1992, Asad M. Madni sat at the helm of BEI Sensors and Controls, overseeing a product line that included a variety of sensor and inertial-navigation devices, but its customers were less varied—mainly, the aerospace and defense electronics industries.

And he had a problem.

The Cold War had ended, crashing the U.S. defense industry. And business wasn’t going to come back anytime soon. BEI needed to identify and capture new customers—and quickly.

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