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Which Companies Pay Engineers the Most?

Juniper Networks, Google, and VMWare shine among U.S. companies that offer high salaries, says recruitment firm Glassdoor

1 min read
Which Companies Pay Engineers the Most?
Photo: Getty Images

Recruitment firm Glassdoor this week ranked the top 25 highest paying companies in the U.S. Tech firms—in particular, those in the San Francisco Bay Area—generally dominated the list (though management consulting firms sat in the number one and two slots).

Of the tech companies, Juniper Networks, which was number three overall, came out on top, with a median compensation—that’s salary plus bonus and other extras—of $157,000.

Google was the next tech firm in the ranking. Its median compensation of $153,750 was high enough to land it at number five. VMware took sixth place, and Amazon Lab126, a Silicon Valley R&D firm that is a subsidiary of Amazon.com, came in seventh.

Guidewire ranked ninth, Cadence Design Systems tenth, and Facebook 12th. After that, it was tech all the way, with spots 13 through 25 held by Twitter, Box, Walmart eCommerce, SAP, Synopsys, Altera, LinkedIn, Cloudera, Salesforce, Microsoft, F5 Networks, Adobe, and Broadcom, anchoring the top 25 at $140,000. (Of these tech companies, only SAP, Microsoft, and Broadcom aren’t based in Northern California.)

Addressing the results of the study, Glassdoor chief economist Andrew Chamberlain, quoted in a blog post from the company, said, “In technology, we continue to see unprecedented salaries as the war for talent is still very active, largely due to the ongoing shortage of highly skilled workers needed.”

To conduct the study, Glassdoor looked at companies whose U.S. based employees submitted more than 50 salary reports detailing their base salary and other forms of compesation over the past year ending 29 March. The full report is here.

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Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

His pivot from defense helped a tiny tuning-fork prevent SUV rollovers and plane crashes

11 min read
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Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

In 1992, Asad M. Madni sat at the helm of BEI Sensors and Controls, overseeing a product line that included a variety of sensor and inertial-navigation devices, but its customers were less varied—mainly, the aerospace and defense electronics industries.

And he had a problem.

The Cold War had ended, crashing the U.S. defense industry. And business wasn’t going to come back anytime soon. BEI needed to identify and capture new customers—and quickly.

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