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What Tech Companies Hired Big in 2018?

Amazon still leads the pack nationally, while Apple tops the list for Silicon Valley, says job search firm Indeed

2 min read
An aerial photo shows Apple's headquarters in California.
Apple’s headquarters, in Cupertino, Calif.
Photo: iStockphoto

What tech companies have tried to hire the most engineers in 2018? Job search firm Indeed.com took a look at job postings from January through November and found Amazon and Microsoft were at the front of the pack for the United States as a whole, while Apple and Amazon ranked one and two, respectively, for Silicon Valley.

While the leaders in both roundups didn’t change from 2017, there was a fair amount of movement down in the ranks. Cisco, No. 2 for Silicon Valley, dropped to four in 2018, while Facebook climbed. Tesla, No. 15 in 2017, didn’t make the Silicon Valley chart in 2018, and neither did Intel or Intuit. Meanwhile, Walmart eCommerce climbed dramatically and Walmart proper made the list for the first time. Nationally, United Health Group and Microsoft were among the companies that moved up significantly, while IBM moved down.

For a closer look at tech hiring trends, see the charts below.

Companies with the highest share of job postings for tech roles in the United States, according to Indeed

Rank (2018)Company nameShare of postings in 2018 (percent)Rank (2017)Share of postings in 2017 (percent)
1Amazon1.771

1.85

2Microsoft0.799

0.57

3Lockheed Martin0.742

0.92

4JP Morgan Chase0.704

0.79

5Best Buy0.635

0.68

6Leidos0.5711

0.54

7Booz Allen Hamilton0.466

0.65

8United Health Group0.4417

0.36

9

Apple0.4318

0.33

10CACI International0.3914

0.45

11IBM0.377

0.62

12Capgemini0.36NA

NA

13General Dynamics Information Technology0.3513

0.46

14Northrop Grumman0.3412

0.52

15Oracle0.3315

0.39

16CSRA0.2916

0.38

17KPMG0.27NA

NA

18Raytheon0.26NA

NA

19Wipro0.26NA

NA

20Bank of America0.25NA

NA

Companies with the highest share of job postings for tech roles in Silicon Valley, according to Indeed

Rank (2018)Company nameShare of postings in 2018 (percent)Rank (2017)Share of postings in 2017 (percent)
1Apple4.231

3.43

2Amazon2.973

1.56

3Facebook1.435

1.06

4Cisco1.292

1.58

5Oracle1.084

1.27

6Walmart eCommerce1.0113

0.68

7Salesforce0.926

0.97

8Walmart0.87NA

NA

9Adobe0.7912

0.71

10Nvidia0.72NA

NA

11Workday0.699

0.74

12Paypal0.6810

0.73

13VMware0.65NA

NA

14eBay0.63NA

NA

15Splunk0.60NA

NA

The Conversation (0)

Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

His pivot from defense helped a tiny tuning-fork prevent SUV rollovers and plane crashes

11 min read
Vertical
Asad Madni and the Life-Saving Sensor

In 1992, Asad M. Madni sat at the helm of BEI Sensors and Controls, overseeing a product line that included a variety of sensor and inertial-navigation devices, but its customers were less varied—mainly, the aerospace and defense electronics industries.

And he had a problem.

The Cold War had ended, crashing the U.S. defense industry. And business wasn’t going to come back anytime soon. BEI needed to identify and capture new customers—and quickly.

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