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Virginia Tech’s RoMeLa Rocks RoboCup 2011

RoMeLa takes first place in both the KidSize and AdultSize humanoid soccer competitions at RoboCup 2011. Watch videos of the matches

2 min read
Virginia Tech’s RoMeLa Rocks RoboCup 2011

/image/1889609CHARLI-2 and DARwIn-OP robots relax in front of the Louis Vuitton Humanoid Cup.

It’s been a wild week at RoboCup 2011 in Istanbul, but we’ve got results for you: Virginia Tech’s RoMeLa has emerged victorious in both the KidSize and AdultSize leagues, and they’re bringing home the stylish and coveted (and stylish) Louis Vuitton Humanoid Cup for Best Humanoid for their AdultSize robot, CHARLI-2. This is big news, since Europe and Asia have historically dominated the RoboCup competitions, and in fact this’ll be the very first time that the Cup (pictured above) has made it to the United States.

/image/1889610Dr. Dennis Hong (center) rewards a DARwIn-OP robot for a job well done.

We’ll have more details for you in the coming weeks from RoMeLa, their Team DARwIn partners at UPenn, and the other RoboCup teams, but for now, they all deserve a little break. Don’t worry, though: we’ve got a bunch of video including RoMeLa’s team of home grown DARwIn-OP humanoids in the finals, CHARLI-2’s final match, and footage of the non-humanoid competitions as well (definitely don’t miss the Middle Size final). Once again, congrats to Dr. Dennis Hong and the entire RoMeLa team (and their robots) for an impressive performance.


KidSize Final Match: Team DARwIn vs. CIT Brains (Japan).


AdultSize Final Match: Team CHARLI vs. Singapore Polytechnic University’s ROBO-ERECTUS.


Middle Size Final Match: Team Tech United (Netherlands) vs. Team Water (China).


Small Size Final Match: Team Skuba (Thailand) vs. Team Immortals (Iran).


Standard Platform Final Match: Team B-Human (Germany) vs. Team Nao Devils (Germany).


TeenSize Final Match: Team NIMBRO (Germany) vs. Team KMUTT Kickers (Thailand).

For more RoboCup 2011 video, check out both the BotSportTV and DutchRobotics YouTube channels.

[ RoboCup 2011 ]

[ RoMeLa ]

The Conversation (0)

The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
DarkGray

In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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