Vegas 911

A sin city programmer busted some of the biggest swindlers of all time. Now he’s helping the Feds nail terrorists.

12 min read
Jeffrey Jonas
Illustration: Brian Hubble; Portrait: Francis George

“Let me show you how I’m getting even with the universe, man,” says Jeffrey Jonas, as he darts across his windowless office near Las Vegas’s McCarran International Airport. Jonas is a lean and natty 40-year-old, dressed in a dark shirt and a flowered tie, with a shiny bald head and a neatly trimmed goatee. Though he retains the mellow surfer-dude cadence of his California youth, he burns like a man shot out of a cannon.

An entrepreneurial whiz kid, Jonas dropped out of high school to launch his own software business. He hit it big early, then figuratively and literally crashed—going bankrupt and becoming temporarily quadriplegic after a car accident—all before the age of 25. He recovered, and then some, rebuilding both his body and his business. He is now one of the major high-tech players in town.

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The EV Transition Explained: Battery Challenges

Batteries expose supply chain and skills gaps

6 min read
A General Motors Hummer EV chassis sits in front of an Hummer EV outside of an event

A General Motors Hummer EV chassis sits in front of an Hummer EV outside an event where GM CEO Mary Barra announced ta $7 billion investment in EV and battery production in Michigan in January 2022.

Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

“Energy and information are two basic currencies of organic and social systems," the economics Nobelist Herb Simon once observed. "A new technology that alters the terms on which one or the other of these is available to a system can work on it the most profound changes.”

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Ownership of AI-Generated Code Hotly Disputed

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4 min read
An illustration of a pixilated person on a ladder placing code.
Edmon De Haro

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Learn How Global Configuration Management and IBM CLM Work Together

In this presentation we will build the case for component-based requirements management

2 min read

This is a sponsored article brought to you by 321 Gang.

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