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“Understanding Delta-Sigma Data Converters” Named Outstanding Professional Book

The publication is the first to receive this recognition from Wiley-IEEE Press

2 min read
Illustration of an award on a stack of books.
Illustration: iStockphoto

Cover of Understanding Delta-Sigma Data Converters, 2nd EditionImage: Wiley/IEEE

THE INSTITUTE Understanding Delta-Sigma Data Converters, 2nd Edition has been selected as the recipient of the first Wiley-IEEE Press outstanding professional book award. The annual award was established this year to honor the best professional book published in the last three years by Wiley-IEEE Press in a field relevant to IEEE.

The Wiley-IEEE Press publishes books and reference works for the engineering and computer science communities.

The authors are IEEE Fellows Shanthi Pavan, Richard E. Schreier, and Gabor Temes. The book covers an important technique used to convert analog signals into digital form—according to a member of the awards committee.

This is an “outstanding book and deserves to be honored as the inaugural recipient,” says another member. “The book is a comprehensive, yet readable resource that encompasses both theory and application details. The authors have an engaging and accessible style, but they don’t shirk on technical depth. The book was clearly a labor of love for the authors, and it shows.”

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Photo of the authors: Shanthi Pavan, Gabor Temes and Richard SchreierFrom left: Gabor Temes, Shanthi Pavan, and Richard ShreierPhotos: Shanthi Pavan; Paddy Duncan

Pavan isan Institute Chair professor of electrical engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology Madras, in Chennai. He has served as the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems. Pavan also serves on the editorial boards of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Letters and the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits. He a Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering.

Schreier, who retired in 2016 from Analog Devices, lives in Ontario, Canada. At Analog, he was a division Fellow in the High-Speed Converters group.

Temes is a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Oregon State University, in Corvallis. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Inventors. Temes is the recipient of the 2006 IEEE Gustav Robert Kirchhoff Award. He was the vice president of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society and received its 2009 Mac Valkenburg Award. He also served as editor of the IEEE Transactions on Circuit Theory.

IEEE Press editor in chief, Ekram Hossain, had this to say about the award and authors, “This is the first award of this kind across IEEE to recognize the excellence of Wiley-IEEE authors. It truly recognizes the impact of their book to our professional community.”

Nominations for the 2021 awards will open in late January and will be considered for two categories: Wiley-IEEE Press Textbook Award and Wiley-IEEE Press Professional Book Award.

IEEE members receive a 35 percent discount off this book if they order it from Wiley. Learn about other benefits of IEEE membership from IEEE Press.

IEEE membership offers a wide range of benefits and opportunities for those who share a common interest in technology. If you are not already a member, consider joining IEEE and becoming part of a worldwide network of more than 400,000 students and professionals.

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