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Top 10 Programming Languages

Spectrum’s 2014 Ranking

1 min read
Top 10 Programming Languages

Editors Note: This is the free sneak peak that accompanies the 2014 Top Programming Languages interactive app. For this year’s top 10 programming languages, head on over to this year’s sneak peek, or just jump directly to the full interactive app. The app lets you customize the rankings to meet your own needs, whether you are looking for a job, wondering what are the hot languages for mobile development, or want to see what’s trending in open source.

Working with computational journalist Nick Diakopoulos, IEEE Spectrum has weighted and combined 12 metrics from 10 sources (including IEEE Xplore, Google, and GitHub) to rank the most popular programming languages. If you don’t agree with our weighting, want to see more languages, or are interested in what’s dominant in a specific subsector, such as mobile, go to our online interactive version. There you can adjust the weight of each metric and create your own custom ranking.

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Quantum Error Correction: Time to Make It Work

If technologists can’t perfect it, quantum computers will never be big

13 min read
Quantum Error Correction: Time to Make It Work
Chad Hagen
Blue

Dates chiseled into an ancient tombstone have more in common with the data in your phone or laptop than you may realize. They both involve conventional, classical information, carried by hardware that is relatively immune to errors. The situation inside a quantum computer is far different: The information itself has its own idiosyncratic properties, and compared with standard digital microelectronics, state-of-the-art quantum-computer hardware is more than a billion trillion times as likely to suffer a fault. This tremendous susceptibility to errors is the single biggest problem holding back quantum computing from realizing its great promise.

Fortunately, an approach known as quantum error correction (QEC) can remedy this problem, at least in principle. A mature body of theory built up over the past quarter century now provides a solid theoretical foundation, and experimentalists have demonstrated dozens of proof-of-principle examples of QEC. But these experiments still have not reached the level of quality and sophistication needed to reduce the overall error rate in a system.

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