Tips for EE Students on Getting Skills They Need for the Workplace

IEEE-USA book offers practical ways to become a better communicator

3 min read
Cover of the new IEEE-USA e-book, Transitioning from Student to Engineer.
Image: iStockphoto/IEEE

THE INSTITUTEAs a new college graduate, you might think all you need to get a job is a killer résumé that shows you can master the position’s technical aspects. But you also need to become adept at communicating with people, according to Harry T. Roman, the author of a new IEEE-USA e-book, Transitioning From Student to Engineer. The e-book costs US $4.99, but IEEE members can buy it for $2.99.

Roman, who is retired, spent more than 30 years as project manager for the R&D group of Public Service Electric and Gas Co. in Newark, N.J. He recently finished a three-year term serving on the advisory board at his alma mater, the New Jersey Institute of Technology, also in Newark. That experience, he wrote in the book’s forward, showed him that many of the school’s budding engineers didn’t see the value of acquiring skills such as project management, team building, and coaching.

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The Transistor at 75

The past, present, and future of the modern world’s most important invention

1 min read
A photo of a birthday cake with 75 written on it.
Lisa Sheehan
LightGreen

Seventy-five years is a long time. It’s so long that most of us don’t remember a time before the transistor, and long enough for many engineers to have devoted entire careers to its use and development. In honor of this most important of technological achievements, this issue’s package of articles explores the transistor’s historical journey and potential future.

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