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Tips for EE Students on Getting Skills They Need for the Workplace

IEEE-USA book offers practical ways to become a better communicator

3 min read
Cover of the new IEEE-USA e-book, Transitioning from Student to Engineer.
Image: iStockphoto/IEEE

THE INSTITUTEAs a new college graduate, you might think all you need to get a job is a killer résumé that shows you can master the position’s technical aspects. But you also need to become adept at communicating with people, according to Harry T. Roman, the author of a new IEEE-USA e-book, Transitioning From Student to Engineer. The e-book costs US $4.99, but IEEE members can buy it for $2.99.

Roman, who is retired, spent more than 30 years as project manager for the R&D group of Public Service Electric and Gas Co. in Newark, N.J. He recently finished a three-year term serving on the advisory board at his alma mater, the New Jersey Institute of Technology, also in Newark. That experience, he wrote in the book’s forward, showed him that many of the school’s budding engineers didn’t see the value of acquiring skills such as project management, team building, and coaching.

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Letting Robocars See Around Corners

Using several bands of radar at once can give cars a kind of second sight

10 min read
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Illustration of the modeling of a autonomous vehicle within a urban city intersection.

Seeing around the corner is simulated by modeling an autonomous vehicle approaching an urban intersection with four high-rise concrete buildings at the corners. A second vehicle is approaching the center via a crossing road, out of the AV’s line of sight, but it can be detected nonetheless through the processing of signals that return either by reflecting along multiple paths or by passing directly through the buildings.

Chris Philpot

An autonomous car needs to do many things to make the grade, but without a doubt, sensing and understanding its environment are the most critical. A self-driving vehicle must track and identify many objects and targets, whether they’re in clear view or hidden, whether the weather is fair or foul.

Today’s radar alone is nowhere near good enough to handle the entire job—cameras and lidars are also needed. But if we could make the most of radar’s particular strengths, we might dispense with at least some of those supplementary sensors.

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